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Internet of Things 2018: Everything Is Connected


Speaker(s): Gerard James Hayes, Ph.D., Hana Oh, Ph.D., Ken Mortensen, Kipper V. Tew, Leonard T. Nuara, Mark Eichorn, Mark Wolff, Ph.D., Pamela Clark-Meister, Peter Brown, Richard Guida, Thomas Snyder
Recorded on: Jul. 27, 2018
PLI Program #: 233890

Dr. Hayes has nearly three decades of experience in government and commercial electromagnetic research and design.  Prior to working with the Town of Wake Forest to establish the WRCNC in 2010, Dr. Hayes was the Director of Engineering at GreenWave Scientific where he led the development of antenna and RF circuit designs for a diverse range of DoD applications.  At Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications (USA) Inc., Dr. Hayes provided global technical leadership in the Technology and Research organization with contributions to handset antenna design, technology, and radiated performance optimization.  At Lockheed Martin (formerly Lockheed Missiles and Space Co.), Dr. Hayes supported research and development efforts for space-based, phased array applications.  The scope of his experience encompasses electromagnetic theory, bioelectromagnetics, antenna design, RF circuit analysis, and material engineering. He has participated in the development of international standards for OTA, HAC, and SAR evaluation (including IEEE, IEC, CTIA, and C63 standards).  With over 70 US patents, Dr. Hayes has maintained a prominent technical role in the wireless industry.


Kipper (Kip) Tew concentrates his practice on public affairs and municipal law, including smart cities and IoT, gaming, alcohol, utilities, and campaign finance. Kip has also been actively involved in the political process. He was the state chair of the Barack Obama presidential campaign in Indiana. He is also the former chairman of the Indiana Democratic Party.

Kip also served as chief legal counsel to then Minority Leader and previous Speaker of the House B. Patrick Bauer. He has been an adviser in various statewide campaigns, including campaigns for the secretary of state and the United States Senate. In addition, he served as deputy campaign manager for Governor Joe Kernan.

Kip was part of the state task force to restructure Indiana's tax code. He also participated in several trade missions to Japan, Taiwan and England.

Kip served on the campaign staff of Indiana Governor Frank O'Bannon, was chair of the Marion County Democratic Party, and has been a member of the Indianapolis City County Council. He is the author of the book Journey to Blue, How Barack Obama Won Indiana in 2008. He began his legal career as counsel to a major agency in state government, the Bureau of Motor Vehicles. He later became manager of government affairs at PSI Energy (now Duke Energy, a multi-state electric and gas utility), where he concentrated on all issues relating to utilities, including environmental issues.


Pamela Clark-Meister is an in-house attorney with over 20 years of experience shaping business and legal strategy, managing complex technology transactions, and advising on intellectual property, commercial and M&A transactions. With Intel since 1999, she is currently serving as a Group Counsel to Intel’s Internet of Things Group (IOTG).  IOTG is leading the industry in transforming businesses and the way we live by making it simple, smart and connected IOT solutions.


Rich Guida has 45 years of professional experience covering information security and related fields.  He spent 25 years in the Department of the Navy where he was responsible for the technical, regulatory, environmental and security aspects of nuclear propulsion aboard U.S. Navy submarines and aircraft carriers.  He was appointed to the Federal Senior Executive Service in 1989 and received a Presidential Meritorious Rank award in 1996.

Rich left government service in 2001 to join Johnson & Johnson, from which he retired in 2011 as Vice President, Worldwide Information Security (the J&J Chief Information Security Officer).  During his time there, he was responsible for information security across the entire J&J enterprise.  Over the past seven years since his retirement from J&J, he has performed private consulting work for clients in the pharmaceutical, medical device, retail, insurance, financial, and telecommunications sectors, and for a Federal agency.  While this work covered a wide range of information security matters, it focused on:

  • Helping clients identify and categorize information security risks, and then helping them ensure that those risks are properly assessed in business processes.Some of this effort has been done in the context of achieving ISO 27001 compliance.
  • Helping clients select, implement, and manage Identity and Access Management solutions covering their own enterprise employees as well as contractors and customers, to meet information security and audit requirements.
  • Helping clients construct and implement comprehensive information security policies, standards, and controls.This includes ensuring alignment with critical business processes to support proper trade-offs with business impact.

In addition to publishing numerous professional and technical articles, Rich is the author of a book on information security entitled The Entropy Police: Practicing Information Security in the Enterprise.  That book includes chapters on information security risk management, identity and access management including authentication, incident management, and business continuity.

Rich also served as a member of the Information Security and Privacy Advisory Board of the Department of Commerce from 2000 through 2005, and as a member of the U.S. Army Science Board from 2011 through 2015.  He is a CISSP.  Rich graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with an SB in Electrical Engineering (Computer Science) and an SM in Nuclear Engineering, and he subsequently received an MBA from The George Washington University.


Dr. Wolff has over 25 years of experience in the health and life science industries as a scientist and analyst working in the U.S. and Europe. Mark joined SAS in 2005 and is an Advisory Industry Consultant and Chief Health Analytics Strategist for the SAS Global IoT Division. Mark’s areas of expertise include the development and application of advanced and predictive analytics in healthcare and life sciences with a particular interest in outcomes and safety. Current work focuses on methods and application of Machine Learning to real time Sensor/IoT data in support of outcomes and safety research, visualization and development of intelligent, decision support systems. Prior to joining SAS Mark held a variety of research and leadership positions in academia, government and industry. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from Loyola College in Maryland, a Master of Science in Entomology and a Doctorate in Toxicology from North Carolina State University.


Lennie is a nationally recognized authority on technology and internet law and co-author of Drafting Internet Agreements, a practical legal treatise with annotated forms on internet and computer law published by the Aspen Publishers division of Wolters Kluwer Law & Business. Lennie formerly was a partner at several prominent law firms and served as the Chair of the Technology & Intellectual Property Practice of Thacher Proffitt & Wood, LLP, and was a partner in the Intellectual Property and Technology Practice at Greenberg Traurig, LLP.

Known for his high energy and unique blend of practice-legal knowledge, technology expertise and skills, Lennie serves as trusted advisor to dozens of multinationals and smaller corporates, hospitals and healthcare providers, financial institutions, startups and venture firms across industries including, E-business, retail, hardware and software, communications and energy, frequently involving the development and deployment of breakthrough and best-of-show technologies. His recognized technology law expertise coupled with his IT education and experience gained while operating technology companies provide unique insights that benefit clients who engage Lennie for strategic guidance and counseling.

Lennie also advises clients on privacy, cyber security and compliance. He offers specialized expertise in the creation of dynamic workflows and incident recovery solutions to manage and mitigate risk exposures. Clients engage Lennie regularly as a special counsel or to manage complex litigation in areas requiring his unique skill set and knowledge.

Lennie gained recognition as a “go to” technology expert and problem solver following the tragic destruction of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, home to Thacher Proffitt & Wood’s main office. Miraculously, no employees of the firm perished, but the destruction of the Twin Towers resulted in a complete loss of all of the firm's technology infrastructure and backup systems. On that day, Lennie interrupted his practice of law and became the CIO of the firm for the following six months. He was responsible for all decisions for the interim survival and ultimate rebuilding of the firm's technology infrastructure, including: equipment specification and acquisition, conversion of the firm's applications palette; extensive outsourcing of such IT functions as help desk and infrastructure management. The experience of losing everything, rebuilding everything from scratch, being the buyer instead of “representing the buyer” has given Lennie valuable insights that inform his practice even today. He has published and spoken on the lessons that he learned from this experience at seminars throughout the U.S. and Europe.

Prior to joining Flatiron, Lennie was Chief Operating Officer and General Counsel for ICF Mercantile, a technical textile distributor of medical, aerospace and construction yarn where he managed the transformation from a distribution to manufacturing business in a new state of the art manufacturing, research and development center. While at ICF he was responsible for all aspects of business operations, legal and IT, including creating the financial and production models to support the financing for transition; negotiations of the lease, construction, engineering, and architectural services agreements; and on-site management of construction resulting in an on-time and on budget startup.

Before ICF, he was the co-founder, President and Chief Operating Officer of Tera Group and TeraExchange. Lennie and his co-founder developed and managed the strategic evolution of the first and only multi-asset, Central Limit Order Book and RFQ based Swap Execution Facility and multi-asset execution management system from inception into a Dodd Frank Act - CFTC regulated institutional exchange for cleared derivatives, equities, futures, fixed income and options markets. Derivatives assets include IRS, CDS, NDF, and the first regulated Bitcoin derivative based on the TeraBit Bitcoin Price Index. While at Tera he managed the firm's operation including fundraising, client/investor presentations and relationships, operations, legal, regulatory, financial, marketing, business development and technology development and implementation.

An experienced commercial litigator, Lennie has handled high-stakes disputes in involving IP infringement, engineering and construction, IT systems and Internet businesses, including the successful resolution of several multi-hundred million dollar matters.

With over 250 articles and presentations, Lennie is one of the most sought-after lecturers in the country on Technology, Internet Law, Cybersecurity, Privacy, Cloud Computing, Social Media, Intellectual Property, Licensing, Techno-Entertainment, Negotiations, Identity Theft, Technology and Intellectual Property Litigation, E-Discovery, Online Child Safety and Law Practice Management.


Peter Brown has focused on Information Technology law matters in national law firms for over 25 years. He is currently the principal of Peter Brown & Associates PLLC, a New York boutique law firm concentrating in Information Technology, Intellectual Property and arbitration.

“The Best Lawyers in America” ® publication honored him as the “Lawyer of the Year” in Information Technology Law 2018 for New York City.

Mr. Brown has experience in a wide variety of litigations and arbitrations relating to the Internet, information technology and intellectual property. He regularly appears in both federal and state courts throughout the United States. In addition, Mr. Brown acts as an arbitrator and mediator on IT and IP matters.

Throughout his career he has drafted and negotiated a broad array of agreements relating to the Internet, outsourcing, cloud computing services, Internet apps and e-commerce.

Mr. Brown co-authored the leading treatises Emerging Technologies and the Law and Computer Law. He also co-authors a monthly column on Information Technology Law for the New York Law Journal.

Mr. Brown is regularly featured as a speaker at the International Technology Law Association, local bar associations and other professional organizations in the US and abroad. He frequently speaks on the topic of artificial intelligence.

The Best Lawyers in America 2019 edition (affiliated with U.S. News & World Report), rated Peter Brown & Associates PLLC a First Tier National Technology Law firm. Chambers USA, New York Metro Superlawyers and other ratings organization have all given Mr. Brown high ratings in the fields of IT and IP. For further information see www.browntechlegal.com


Tom is Executive Director of RIoT, supporting Internet of Things and disruptive technology industry growth. By day he runs RIoT Labs at HQ Raleigh. In his spare time, Tom co-instructs Product Innovation Lab, a Forbes award winning multi-disciplinary course in Innovation and Entrepreneurship at NC State.

Prior to joining RIoT, Tom held an executive leadership role at the ASSIST Center, a National Science Foundation sponsored effort to create wearable electronics for healthcare monitoring. Previously, he spent two decades in product development and technology incubation in NC.

He’s passionate about creating and fostering collaborations across disciplines, markets and cultures. He enjoys the outdoors, woodworking, boardgames, big crowds, craft beer and ideas that are just crazy enough to work.


Mark Eichorn is an Assistant Director in the FTC Bureau of Consumer Protection’s Division of Privacy and Identity Protection (DPIP), where he supervises privacy and data security matters.  He joined DPIP at the end of 2009 from FTC Chairman Jon Leibowitz’s office, where he served as an attorney advisor for Chairman (and previously Commissioner) Leibowitz on consumer protection issues.  After joining the Commission in 1998, Mark worked for many years as an attorney in the Division of Advertising Practices and served a six month stint in 2003 as an attorney advisor to FTC Commissioner Leary.  Mark went to law school at the University of Virginia, and later clerked for Ninth Circuit Judge Robert Beezer.


Hana Oh, Ph.D., is an MIT-trained attorney in O’Melveny’s Intellectual Property and Technology practice group. Hana focusses on patent and trade secret litigation and licensing issues for innovative companies, including Samsung, Micron, Belkin, Alcon, and Novartis. Hana is registered to practice before the US Patent and Trademark Office. She assists clients with in-depth analyses of complex scientific and technical issues arising in intellectual property disputes, and has extensive experience working closely with expert witnesses. She has been involved in many phases of litigation and discovery, from pleadings to written discovery to motion practice to managing review teams on complex foreign language document production and privilege log preparation. Hana also has experience in prosecuting patents and developing portfolios in a wide range of high technology industries. She is fluent in Korean.

Externships

  • Justice Richard M. Aronson, California Court of Appeal

Author

  • “Combating Baseless Patent Suits: Rule 11 Sanctions with Technology-Specific Application,” Jurimetrics (Joint publication of Arizona State College of Law and the ABA Section of Science & Technology Law), 53 Jurimetrics J.135–178 (2014)

Admissions

  • Bar Admissions, California
  • Court Admissions, US District Court for the Central and Northern Districts of California
  • Registered to Practice, US Patent and Trademark Office

Education

  • University of California at Los Angeles, J.D.
  • University of Pennsylvania, Ph.D.: Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology, B.S.: Chemical Engineering

Languages

  • Korean
  • German


Ken Mortensen, Esq., is the InterSystems’ Data Protection Officer promoting and leading Global Trust and Privacy for the company. He is based in their Cambridge headquarters and has global responsibility across the company to enhance information privacy, governance, and cyber risk processes not only in the development and deployment of InterSystems technology, but also in the management of operations and services. Ken focuses on enhancing global trust and privacy throughout InterSystems demonstrating to customers, clients, and stakeholders our commitment to investing and growing the capabilities of InterSystems in order to stay in front of emerging risks for privacy and cybersecurity.

Prior to joining InterSystems, Ken was a Senior Managing Director over at PwC specializing in data protection, privacy, and cybersecurity and led the expansion of PwC’s healthcare privacy offerings. Before that, Ken was the Vice President, Assistant General Counsel & Chief Privacy Officer at CVS Health, where he created the Information Governance Department and was responsible for overseeing enterprise information governance to deliver privacy compliance as well as leading the information security risk management organization to address cyber risks. While at CVS, he oversaw compliance with CVS’s FTC Consent Decree, OCR Corrective Action plan, and PCI program, including securing the first-ever closure letter from OCR. He was also the first Chief Privacy Officer for Boston Scientific responsible for implementing a global privacy and security program and introducing a governance emphasis for risk. 

Prior to that, Ken served in the Administration of President George W. Bush as the Associate Deputy Attorney General for the U.S. Department of Justice, where he was the primary counsel and policy advisor to the Attorney General and Deputy Attorney General on privacy and civil liberties matters. While at Justice, he led the U.S. delegation to negotiate privacy and cybersecurity terms with the European Union as well as oversaw the privacy and civil liberties processes for numerous national security and foreign intelligence programs, including work with the National Security Council related to FISA and EO 12333. Prior to going to Justice, Ken served at the U.S. Dep’t of Homeland Security as part of the team that stood up the Privacy Office at the beginning of the agency eventually as Deputy Chief Privacy Officer.

Before his government service, Ken was a partner in his own law firm as one of the early practitioners of privacy and security law, during which he served as Special Counsel to the Pennsylvania Attorney General. He taught computer law and information policy at Villanova Law School and was an electrical engineer at Burroughs in Large System Design focusing on information assurance and system test.

Ken is a former member of the board of directors for the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), including serving as Secretary for one year. He currently serves on the IAPP Research Advisory Board and the board of Shared Assessments, an organization focused on addressing third party information risks. Previously, Ken served on the board of the Health Information Trust Alliance (HITRUST) and participated in the development of the privacy control category of the HITRUST CSF. 

Ken currently teaches privacy law at Boston University Law School and cybersecurity law at the University of Maine School of Law. Ken is co-author with Andy Serwin of the West Publishing book, Healthcare Security and Privacy Law, and has authored chapters and sections for other privacy, cybersecurity, and governance risk books and publications. He is an internationally recognized expert on these topics and speaks globally on privacy, cybersecurity, and the governance of information.

Ken is admitted to the bars of Pennsylvania and New Jersey as well as the Supreme Court of the United States. He received his Juris Doctorate from Villanova University School of Law, his MBA from the Villanova University College of Finance, and his Bachelor’s of Science in Engineering degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Drexel University. He has a Certificate in Foreign Intelligence Law from the Judge Advocate General's School of Law. He has CIPP/US, CIPP/G, and CIPM certifications from IAPP.