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The Art of Lawyering During and After the Pandemic: Keeping Your Composure While Dealing with Biases and Bullying


Speaker(s): Gail Gottehrer, Hon. Bernice Bouie Donald, Nicole Lancia, Ronald J. Hedges
Recorded on: Oct. 9, 2020
PLI Program #: 310514

Ronald is a member of Dentons' Litigation and Dispute Resolution practice group. He has extensive experience in e-discovery and in the management of complex litigation and has served as a special master, arbitrator and mediator. He also consults on management and discovery of electronically stored information (“ESI”).

Recognition

In the Media

  • Quoted, "Confusion Lingers Around Preservation and FRCP Changes for Corporate Counsel," Corporate Counsel, September 13, 2016

Insights

  • Co-author, "Rules of Professional Conduct Enter Era of Electronically Stored Information," Law Week Colorado, p. 16, September 2016
  • Author, "Confidentiality Order Standards," Federal Magistrate Judges Association Bulletin, September 2016
  • Co-Author, “Competence with Electronically Stored Information: What Does It Mean in the Context of Litigation and How Can Attorneys Achieve it,” 15 DDEE 135 (2015)
  • International Extradition: A Guide for Judges (Federal Judicial Center: 2014)
  • Co-Senior Editor, The Sedona Conference® Cooperation Proclamation: Resources for the Judiciary (The Sedona Conference®: 2014, 2012 & 2011)
  • Co-Author, Managing Discovery of Electronic Information: A Pocket Guide for Judges (Federal Judicial Center: 2012 & 2007)
  • Discovery of Electronically Stored Information: Surveying the Legal Landscape (BNA: 2007)
  • Editing Team Member, The Sedona Guidelines: Best Practices Addressing Protective Orders, Confidentiality & Public Access in Civil Cases (The Sedona Conference®: 2007)
  • “Case Management and E-Discovery: Perfect Together,” 9 DDEE 220 (2009)
  • “Rule 26(f): The Most Important E-Discovery Rule,” New Jersey L. J. (May 18, 2009)
  • “A View from the Bench and the Trenches: A Critical Appraisal of Some Proposed Amendments to the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure,” 227 F.R.D. 123 (2005)

Activities and Affiliations

  • Member, American Law Institute
  • Member, American Bar Association
  • Member, Federal Bar Association
  • Member, Historical Society
  • Member, Lawyers Advisory Committee of the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey
  • Member, The Sedona Conference Judicial Advisory Board
  • Member, The Sedona Conference Working Group on Protective Orders, Confidentiality, and Public Access
  • Member, The Sedona Conference Working Group on Best Practices for Electronic Document Retention and Production
  • Member, Advisory Board of the Advanced E-Discovery Institute of Georgetown University Law Center.

Prior and Present Employment

Ron Hedges was a United States Magistrate Judge in the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey from 1986 to 2007. While a magistrate judge, he was the Compliance Judge for the Court Mediation Program, a member of the Lawyers Advisory Committee, and both a member of, and reporter for, the Civil Justice Reform Act Advisory Committee. From 2001 to 2005 he was a member of the Advisory Group of Magistrate Judges.

Ron was an adjunct professor at Seton Hall University School, where he taught mediation skills. He was an adjunct professor at Georgetown University Law Center and remains an adjunct professor at Rutgers School of Law—Newark. He taught courses on electronic discovery and evidence at both these schools. Ron was a Fellow at the Center for Information Technology of Princeton University for 2010-11 and 2011-12. He is also a member of the College of the State Bar of Texas.

Areas of focus

Arbitration
Communications
Digital Media
E-Discovery
Energy
Energy Litigation
Environmental Litigation
Health Care
Information Governance
Life Sciences
Life Sciences and Health Care
Litigation and Dispute Resolution
Media Regulation
Mediation
Privacy and Cybersecurity
Technology

Education

Georgetown University Law Center, 1977, JD

Admissions and qualifications

District of Columbia
New Jersey
New York
Texas


Nicole Lancia is an attorney with the National Labor Relations Board.  Nicole graduated from Georgetown University in 2007, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy, magna cum laude, with minors in Spanish and African-American Studies.  She then attended Georgetown University Law Center and graduated in 2010.  After law school, Nicole joined the National Labor Relations Board in Washington, D.C., where she wrote briefs and presented oral argument in several circuit courts of appeals seeking to obtain enforcement of Board orders.  For the second half of 2013, on a detail to the U.S. Attorney's Office in Washington, D.C., Nicole served as a Special Assistant U.S. Attorney in the Sex Offenses and Domestic Violence Unit, conducting misdemeanor bench trials, pre-trial detention hearings, and probation show cause hearings.  In 2016, Nicole transferred back to her native New York to work in the NLRB's Manhattan office, where she investigates unfair-labor-practice charges under the NLRA, conducts administrative hearings, and negotiates settlement agreements.  Outside of work, Nicole also serves as a co-chair on the Phi Beta Kappa New York Chapter's Diversity and Inclusion Committee.  Nicole Lancia was born in Manhattan and raised in Forest Hills, where she currently lives.    


The Honorable Bernice B. Donald received her law degree from the University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law, a LLM from Duke University School of Law, and an honorary Doctors in Law from Suffolk University.  Prior to being appointed to the U.S. Court of Appeals by President Barack Obama in 2011, she served on the U.S. District Court for more than fifteen years. 

Judge Donald is currently a member of the prestigious American Law Institute and the American Bar Association Judicial Division.  Previously, she served as Chair of the American Bar Association (“ABA”) Center for Human Rights and recently chaired a committee which published an implicit bias resource book for judges and practitioners titled, Enhancing Justice: Reducing Bias. Judge Donald also served as Chair of the ABA Criminal Justice Section, focusing on issues concerning implicit bias, children of incarcerated parents, mass incarceration, and the collateral consequences of incarceration.  Having previously served as Secretary of the American Bar Association (ABA), Judge Donald served in the ABA House of Delegates until August 2018.  She has been faculty at the National Judicial College, the Federal Judicial Center, and the Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center & School.  Judge Donald also served as faculty for the Federal Magistrate Judges Conference held in Portland, Oregon, where she was part of the panel titled, Thinking, Blinking, and Judging: Addressing Implicit Biases.  She served as Jurist in Residence at American University, Washington University, University of Cincinnati School of Law, and the University of Georgia School of Law.  In addition, she has served as faculty for international programs in more than twenty countries. 

Judge Donald’s writings include the following:  A Glimpse Inside the Brain’s Black Box: Understanding the Role of Neuroscience in Criminal Sentencing, 85 Fordham L. Rev. 481 (2016); Not Your Father’s Legal Profession: Technology, Globalization, Diversity, and the Future of Law Practice in the United States, 44 U. Mem. L. Rev. 645 (2014); Bringing Back Reasonable Inferences: A Short, Simple Suggestion for Addressing Some Problems at the Intersection of Employment Discrimination and Summary Judgment, 57 N.Y.L. Sch. L. Rev. 749 (2012-2013); The Not-So-New Normal of the Legal Profession: Facing and Confounding the Odds, 23 Am. U. J. Gender Soc. Pol’y & L. 1 (2014);  Immigrants and Other Cultural Minorities as Non-Traditional Plaintiffs: Culture as a Factor in Determining Tort Damages, 92 Judicature 220 (2009); Fifty Years Later and Miranda Still Leaves Us With Questions, 50 Tex Tech L. Rev. 1 (2017); The Dischargeability of Property Settlement and Hold Harmless Agreements in Bankruptcy: An Overview of § 523(a)(15), 31 Family L. Quarterly 409 (1997); To This Tribunal the Freedman Has Turned: The Freedman’s Bureau’s Judicial Powers and the Origins of the Fourteenth Amendment, 79 La. L. Rev. 1 (2018); When the Rule of Law Breaks Down: Implications of the 1866 Memphis Massacre for the Passage of the Fourteenth Amendment, 98 U. Boston L. Rev. 1607 (2018); She Stands on Her Own, Amongst Many: The Women of the Tennessee Supreme Court, 86.3 Tenn. L. Rev.  593 (2019); and Implicit Bias: Should the Legal Community Be Bothered?, 2 J. PLI Press, 615 (2018).

Judge Donald has received over 100 awards for professional, civic, and community activities, including the Distinguished Alumni Award from the University of Memphis, the Martin Luther King Community Service Award, the Benjamin Hooks Award from the Memphis Bar Foundation, the prestigious Margaret Brent Award, the Spirit of Excellence Award, the John Pickering Award of Achievement, the University of Memphis Pillars of Excellence Award, and the Inaugural Liberty Award from the Tort, Trial and Insurance Section of the ABA.


After practicing law at law firms for over 20 years, Gail recently founded her own firm, where her practice focuses on emerging technologies-related litigation and counseling, including autonomous vehicle regulation, drones, robots, artificial intelligence, AI ethics, biometrics, facial recognition, the IoT, data privacy, and cybersecurity.  She is one of the few defense lawyers to have been involved in the trial of a class action to verdict before a jury.

Gail teaches Law for Knowledge Innovation at Columbia University, and is a member of the Advisory Board for Rutgers University’s Leading Disruptive Innovation Program, and a Fellow at the Center for Legal Innovation at Vermont Law School.

In addition to being appointed to the State of Connecticut’s Task Force to Study Fully Autonomous Vehicles, Gail serves as Co-Chair of the New York State Bar Association’s Technology and the Legal Profession Committee, and is a member of NYSBA’s Transportation Committee.  She is the New York Regional Co-Chair for the ABA’s Judicial Intern Opportunity Program, Co-Chair of the Programming Committee of the ABA’s Woman Advocate Committee, Vice-Chair of the ABA-TIPS Automobile Litigation Committee, Co-Chair of the National Association of Women Lawyers’ IP & Technology Affinity Group, Editor of the ABA’s Pretrial Practice and Discovery Newsletter, and a member of the Sedona Conference Working Group 1.

Gail was selected as one the Profiles in Diversity Journal’s 2017 Women Worth Watching in STEM and one of the Connecticut Technology Council’s 2016 Women of Innovation.  She is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School, and served as a law clerk to the Honorable Murray C. Goldman, in the Philadelphia County Court of Common Pleas.  Gail is admitted to practice in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Pennsylvania.