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Cloud Computing 2012: Cut Through the Fluff & Tackle the Critical Stuff


Speaker(s): Charlene T. Storino, Christine E. Lyon, Christopher Wolf, Janine Anthony Bowen, Jason M. Silverman, Jeremy R. Feinberg, John Collins, Maura R. Grossman, Rachel Beth Evans, Tanya L. Forsheit, Todd Machtmes
Recorded on: Jun. 11, 2012
PLI Program #: 34248

John Collins has spent the past 12 years building and operating some of the world's biggest and most popular Internet services: Excite@Home, Hotmail, and Google, having held such positions as Network Design Engineering Manager, Group Program Manager and Site Reliability Engineering PM. Mr. Collins recently spent a year in London  focused directly on European interests regarding the security and privacy of Google Apps. John leads Google Enterprise's global Trust effort, bridging Engineering, Operations, Legal, Sales, Marketing, and Government Policy teams. Mr. Collins holds a BS in Molecular & Cell Biology from the University of Connecticut as well as MBA's from both Columbia University and the Haas School of Business at the University of California, Berkeley.


Charlene T. Storino
Army Contracting Command - National Capital Region


Primary Areas of Practice:  Government Contracts


Law School:  University of Wisconsin Law School


Work History 

US Army, 2003-Present
Professor, Contract and Fiscal Law Department, US Army Reserve, 2010-Present


Christopher Wolf is a director of Hogan Lovells' Privacy and Information Management practice group. Chris is widely recognized as one of the leading American practitioners in the field of privacy and data security law. He is known to clients as a practical problem solver on issues arising from the collection, use, retention, sharing, and security of personal data; as a thoughtful compliance counselor focused on risk management; and as an effective advocate in federal court, at the Federal Trade Commission or before state agencies, on the entire range of international and domestic privacy issues.

Chris is known to the privacy community as a thought leader and compelling communicator. PLI tapped Chris to serve as editor and lead author of its first-ever treatise on the subject, and to serve as co-editor of its guide to the FACTA Red Flags identity theft regulations. Chris recently was heralded for his "lifelong experience as a litigator" by Chambers USA by ranking him as one of the nation's top privacy lawyers. He also was asked to form and co-chair The Future of Privacy Forum, a think tank that focuses on modern privacy issues with a business practical-consumer friendly perspective, collaborating with industry, government, academia, and privacy advocates. When MSNBC labeled Chris "a pioneer in Internet law," it was reflecting on his participation in many of the precedent-setting matters that form the framework of modern privacy law.

Chris serves on an OECD experts panel addressing the OECD privacy guidelines. He is a frequent speaker for the International Association of Privacy Professionals on topics ranging from privacy and cloud computing to negotiating with the FTC. He was the only privacy lawyer to speak at the eG8 in Paris, an event hosted by French President Sarkozy. Maurice Levy, Chairman of Publicis and of the eG8 Forum, has observed that Chris is a "key player in the [Internet] community" who, through his role as a speaker in the eG8 privacy workshop "[made an] important contribution to ensuring that the Forum was an unprecedented moment in the history of the Internet and ... a rich generator of ideas for policy-makers and industry leaders alike."

Chris also has spoken at colleges and universities including Harvard, Stanford, Berkeley, the University of Chicago, George Washington University, Georgetown University, and the Washington & Lee University School of Law. He is a frequent television guest on privacy and related issues, appearing on PBS, NBC, MSNBC, CNN, Fox News, and others.
 
Chris chaired the Washington board of the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) and is a national ADL leader, serving in various capacities nationally.  Chris also co-chairs the Inter-Parliamentary Coalition Against Anti-Semitism Task Force on Internet Hate.   In 2010, Chris was presented with the Outstanding Alumnus Award by his law school, and received this tribute: "There are few lawyers in the nation-indeed, few lawyers in the world-who have done more to champion the norms of human decency and respect for the rule of law in the Internet environment, than Chris Wolf," said Washington & Lee University School of Law Dean Rodney A. Smolla at the awards ceremony. "It is difficult to imagine a graduate of our law school who more exemplifies the ideals that this school cherishes, ideals of respect for the rule of law, human decency, and public service."

The pro bono matters handled by Chris include McVeigh v. Cohen, 983 F.Supp. 215 (D.D.C. 1998), in which a federal court enjoined the United States Navy from discharging a Naval Chief Petty Officer for violating the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy on gays and lesbians in the military because the Navy obtained information from AOL in violation of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. Chris also successfully represented Army First Lieutenant (and Arizona State Delegate) Steve May in resisting his proposed discharge under "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," a matter involving the Speech and Debate Clause of the U.S. Constitution. Chris has served as outside general counsel for the International Centre for Missing and Exploited Children, and he has helped organize volunteer pro bono legal services from D.C. Bar members for the Whitman-Walker Clinic.

Prior to joining the firm, Chris was a partner in a large, international law firm. Chris is a fourth-generation Washingtonian who started his career in Washington, D.C. as law clerk to The Honorable Aubrey E. Robinson, Jr., of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia. While in law school, he was a member of the Washington & Lee Law Review.


Jeremy R. Feinberg is the Statewide Special Counsel for Ethics and the Commercial Division at New York's Office of Court Administration (OCA). Among his duties at OCA, he provides ethics training, support and advice to the judges and non-judicial employees of the Unified Court System.

Mr. Feinberg is a regular speaker and panel moderator on legal ethics at Continuing Legal Education (CLE) programs around New York and has taught legal and judicial ethics as far away as Florida and Alaska. He is an adjunct professor of ethics and professional responsibility at Columbia Law School and has served as a guest lecturer at a number of New York area law schools.

He is the Chair of the New York City Bar Association's Committee on Professional Ethics, a committee which issues formal ethics advisory opinions to lawyers on behalf of that bar association.  He has also served on the City Bar's Council on Judicial Administration, Committee on Professional Responsibility and Committee on Professional Discipline.

In his role as OCA's Statewide Special Counsel for the Commercial Division, Mr. Feinberg provides support and assistance to all of the Commercial Division courts throughout New York, and serves as a liaison between the Bench and the commercial Bar. He serves as a liaison to the Executive Committee of the New York State Bar's Commercial and Federal Litigation Section.

Before joining OCA in January 2006, Mr. Feinberg was a senior litigation associate at Proskauer Rose LLP, where he handled sports law, commercial litigation, and ethics matters for the firm and its clients. He served as law clerk to Hon. Judith S. Kaye, Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals for two years in 1996-1998. He is a 1995 graduate of Columbia Law School and a 1992 graduate of Columbia College.


Todd Machtmes

Primary Areas of Practice: Software Licensing, Commercial Transactions

Legal Education: University of California, Hastings College of Law
 

Work History

After having begun his career as a law firm associate practicing a mixture of commercial litigation and general business transactions, Mr. Machtmes has spent the last twelve years inside technology companies structuring software and software as a service commercial transactions of all types, focusing particularly on complex sales and alliance transactions.  


Christine Lyon advises organizations on cutting-edge issues related to the collection, use, sharing, and safeguarding of data, including personal information of customers and employees. She serves as a trusted advisor, working with clients to develop global strategies to comply with U.S. and international privacy and data protection laws.

Christine’s practice spans a variety of industry sectors, from information technology services to consumer products, and covers clients ranging from start-ups to large multinationals. She advises technology companies on building privacy protections into their offerings, including connected products and services (Internet of Things), cloud-based and mobile services, and social media initiatives, as well as on managing the related “Big Data” implications. She also assists clients in evaluating and managing privacy risks, including in strategic transactions such as IT outsourcing, and mergers and acquisitions.

Legal 500 US recognized Ms. Lyon as a “rising star” in the area of privacy and data protection and recommended her for cyber law, and she received The Burton Award for Distinguished Legal Writing. She frequently writes and speaks on the topics of global data protection laws, workplace privacy issues, and data security laws. She is a co-editor of Global Employee Privacy and Data Security Law (BNA Books) and a member of the editorial board of the World Data Protection Report.


Janine Anthony Bowen's technology-focused practice is on the front lines of innovation. An industrial engineer and forward-thinking counsel, she has earned a solid reputation for her aptitude with technology and intellectual property agreements, privacy and data protection, cloud computing, mobile commerce, and licensing and acquisition -- areas that benefit from her impressive background, including serving as a program manager at IBM and a senior consultant at Accenture. Her comfort with complex issues makes Janine a trusted advisor for clients negotiating technology-related deals with Fortune 500 companies, as well as those in need of intelligent analysis, cost control, strategic growth advice and thought leadership.

Janine's clients aren't the only ones who've taken notice of her strengths: In 2017, she became the first woman to receive the highest honor bestowed by Clemson University's College of Engineering, Computing and Applied Sciences, when she was inducted into the Thomas Green Clemson Academy of Engineers and Scientists.

Select Experience

  • Serving as lead counsel for a $100M ERP software and cloud services acquisition.
  • Serving as lead counsel for a $125M education technology and services business.
  • Serving as lead technology counsel on a $75 million ERP application management outsourcing.

Recognitions

  • The Best Lawyers in America© (2018)
    • Atlanta: Technology Law
  • Thomas Green Clemson Academy of Engineers and Scientists: Inductee (2017)
  • Clemson Alumni Association Distinguished Service Award (2016)
  • Leadership Atlanta: Class of 2011
  • Leadership Georgia: Class of 2009
  • Georgia Trend Magazine, "Legal Elite" (2008)
  • CloudU Certificate


Rachel has been an in-house technology lawyer for over 20 years, and her areas of focus include software-as-a-service, IP licensing, and complex IT transactions. She is currently the commercial legal lead responsible for leading software-as-a-service contract negotiations and strategy for Workday’s central region.

Rachel previously worked at Accenture for 12 years, most recently as a Director of Legal Services, advising senior leadership on regulatory and other legal and business risks with respect to Accenture's HR, infrastructure, and application outsourcing services. Prior to Accenture, she worked at IBM and with Siebel Systems, negotiating complex IT transactions.

Rachel has been a speaker at numerous PLI conferences since 2010 and is admitted to practice law in New York and California. She grew up in the Chicago area, received her undergraduate degree in psychology from the University of Michigan in 1990, and graduated cum laude from Indiana University School of Law in 1994, where she was an editor of the Indiana Law Journal.

Rachel moved back to Chicago in 2016 after spending 22 years in Silicon Valley. When she’s not working, she enjoys volunteering in animal rescue.

Rachel can be contacted at rachel.evans@workday.com.


Widely considered one of the country’s top privacy and data security lawyers, Tanya Forsheit has advised on high-profile matters involving confidential data and other sensitive information for over 20 years. Ms. Forsheit is Chair of Frankfurt Kurnit Klein & Selz’s Privacy & Data Security Group and Supervising Partner of the Los Angeles Office. She advises on the protection, processing and monetization of data, including matters related to interest-based advertising, privacy policies, mobile apps, cloud computing, smart devices, and data analytics.

Ms. Forsheit has advised on hundreds of information technology deals and transactions on behalf of both service providers and enterprise purchasers, including multilayered AdTech and cloud computing agreements. She is routinely called upon to help clients respond to time-sensitive security events and has advised on hundreds of such incidents. She has worked with dozens of multinational clients on the compliance requirements of the EU General Data Protection Regulation, and is currently representing dozens more in preparing for, and addressing the policy implications of, the California Consumer Privacy Act, taking effect in January 2020. 

The Legal 500 praised her in the 2019 edition as “incredibly responsive” and “everything you could ask for in an outside counsel.” The Daily Journal named her as one of the top 20 Cyber attorneys in California in its inaugural 2018 list, and has twice included her in its list of "Top Women Lawyers." She was one of three finalists for the Los Angeles Business Journal’s Cybersecurity Lawyer of the Year recognition in 2017.

Ms. Forsheit lectures widely on technology law topics and has been quoted on privacy and data security in publications such as the Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Forbes, ComputerWorld, Venture Beat, and Law360. She is currently an Adjunct Professor at Loyola Law School.

The International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) has certified Ms. Forsheit as both an Information Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) and Privacy Technologist (CIPT). She sits on the Advisory Council of the Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT). Ms. Forsheit is a past President of the Women Lawyers Association of Los Angeles.


Jason Silverman focuses his practice on government investigations, export controls, white collar criminal defense, and litigation under the False Claims Act.

He has represented companies and individuals in connection with investigations by agencies of the Departments of Justice, Defense, Commerce and State; the Securities and Exchange Commission; and grand juries. Mr. Silverman has also represented clients in civil matters arising under the False Claims Act relating to cost charging, compliance with federal information security requirements, and other Federal contracts compliance issues.

He worked on the legal teams representing the court-appointed bankruptcy Examiner in the bankruptcy cases of Washington Mutual, REFCO, and DBSI, a real estate investment company. He is experienced in conducting internal investigations of potential violations relating to ITAR, EAR, OFAC, and FCPA and has represented clients in numerous voluntary disclosure matters arising under the ITAR and EAR, including classified matters. 

His public interest activities include serving as a member of the Volunteer Leadership Committee of the Washington Humane Society and representing individuals pro bono in criminal matters in DC Superior Court.

Mr. Silverman is a graduate of Northwestern University School of Law.


Maura R. Grossman is a Research Professor in the David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science at the University of Waterloo, in Ontario, as well as an eDiscovery attorney and consultant in New York. Previously, Maura was of counsel at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, where for 17 years, she represented Fortune 100 companies and major financial services institutions in corporate and securities litigation, including civil actions and white collar criminal and regulatory investigations, and advised lawyers and clients on legal, technical, and strategic issues involving eDiscovery and information governance, both domestically and abroad.

Maura is a well-known and influential eDiscovery lawyer.  She is described in Who’s Who Litigation 2015 E-Discovery Analysis as “‘sensational’ according to her peers and . . . a ‘go-to’ in the area.”  Chambers & Partners USA 2015 Litigation:  E-Discovery described her as “the best-known person in the area of technology-assisted review; a superstar among superstars.”  Maura’s scholarly work on TAR, most notably, Technology-Assisted Review in E-Discovery Can Be More Effective and More Efficient Than Exhaustive Manual Review, published in the Richmond Journal of Law and Technology in 2011, has been widely cited in case law, both in the U.S. and elsewhere.  Her longstanding contributions to eDiscovery technology and process, including her multiple patents relating to TAR, were featured in the February 2016 issue of The American Lawyer.

Since 2010, Maura has served as co-chair of the eDiscovery Working Group advising the New York State Unified Court System. She has been a court-appointed special master, neutral/mediator, and eDiscovery expert to the court in multiple high-profile federal cases. Maura has provided eDiscovery training to federal and state court judges, by invitation of the court, and has testified, on several occasions, before the Advisory Committee on the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and the Advisory Committee on Evidence Rules, at their invitation. She is an adjunct professor at Columbia Law School and the Georgetown University Law Center, where she teaches courses on eDiscovery. Previously, Maura taught at Rutgers Law School–Newark and Pace Law School.

Since 2012, Maura has been a member of the Steering Committee of The Sedona Conference® Working Group 1 on Best Practices for Electronic Document Retention and Production. Since 2008, she has been involved in the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s Text Retrieval Conference (“TREC”); in 2010 and 2011, as coordinator of the Legal Track, and since 2015, as coordinator of the Total Recall Track. Maura serves on the Advisory Boards of Bloomberg BNA’s Digital Discovery & e-Evidence Report, the Georgetown University Law Center’s Advanced eDiscovery Institute, the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law’s Cardozo Data Law Initiative, and the Annual Arizona State University (“ASU”)-Arkfeld eDiscovery and Digital Evidence Conference.

Maura graduated with an A.B., magna cum laude, from Brown University. She earned M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Clinical/School Psychology from the Gordon F. Derner Institute of Advanced Psychological Studies at Adelphi University, and a J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from the Georgetown University Law Center. While at Georgetown, Maura served as Executive Notes and Comments Editor of the Georgetown Law Journal.