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Communications Law in the Digital Age 2016


Speaker(s): Aaron P. Rubin, Adam Liptak, Alfredo Della Monica, Allison M. Zieve, Barbara W. Wall, Barton Beebe, Bruce D. Brown, Bruce E. H. Johnson, Bruce P. Keller, Cristina Chou, Dale M. Cohen, David A. Schulz, David Bender, David E. McCraw, Erin L. Dozier, Floyd Abrams, George Freeman, Gigi B. Sohn, Jack M. Weiss, James A. McLaughlin, Jane E. Kirtley, Jason P. Conti, Jeffrey Glasser, Jennifer E. Rothman, Jennifer L. Pariser, Jessica Lyon, Jonathan R. Donnellan, Joseph C. Gratz, Karen Kaiser, Kathleen A. Kirby, Kathleen M. Sullivan, Kelli L. Sager, Leonard Niehoff, Lucy A. Dalglish, Lynn B. Oberlander, Mark Stephens, CBE, Mary-Rose Papandrea, Naomi B. Waltman, Paul M. Smith, Randi S. Pollack, Robert B. Carey, RonNell Andersen Jones, Sherrese M. Smith, Stephanie S. Abrutyn, Steven G. Brody, Sue Friedberg, Thomas G. Hentoff, Thomas S. Leatherbury, Tom Clare
Recorded on: Nov. 10, 2016
PLI Program #: 149252

David Bender is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Houston Law Center, and also at Pace University Law School, where he teaches Privacy Law.  Mr. Bender is a Distinguished Fellow of the Ponemon Institute.  He has had extensive Privacy, Intellectual Property, and Information Technology litigation, counseling, and transactional experience.  He was a founder of the IP practice, and co-founder of the Privacy practice, at White & Case.  Before retiring from White & Case, he headed the firm’s privacy practice.


Mr. Bender served in-house at AT&T for ten years, during the latter half of which he was responsible for all IP litigation brought by or against any Bell System company.  Before that, he spent five years engaged in antitrust litigation.  And before turning to the law, he served as an engineer with the Ford Motor Company’s aerospace division, and as a mathematician with Hughes Aircraft.


Bar Admissions: New York; US Patent and Trademark Office

PublicationsBender on Privacy and Data Protection (Rel.12 2018 LexisNexis); Computer Law published in 1978 and presently in Release #73 (LexisNexis, 6 loose-leaf volumes); and over 100 articles in law reviews and conference proceedings.

Memberships:

  • International Association of Privacy Professionals

  • International Technology Law Association (President, 1999-2000)

  • Association of the Bar of the City of New York

Super Lawyers:

  • New York City Metro Super Lawyer in Information Technology (2006 -- 2011).
  • One of the 25 best lawyers in the Westchester Co., NY Area (2009 - 2011)

Speaking:

Over 300 presentations across the United States and in 19 other nations at conferences sponsored by numerous organizations.


Adam Liptak covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. He joined The Times as a copyboy after graduating from Yale with a degree in English literature.  He returned to Yale for a law degree and went on to practice law for 14 years, specializing in First Amendment issues, first at Cahill Gordon & Reindel and then in the legal department of The New York Times Company. 

Liptak rejoined the paper’s news staff in 2002 as its national legal correspondent.  In 2007, he launched “Sidebar,” a column on legal affairs.  In 2008, he became the paper’s Supreme Court correspondent.

Liptak was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in explanatory reporting in 2009 and received the Scripps Howard Award for Washington reporting in 2010.  He was awarded Hofstra University’s Presidential Medal and an honorary doctorate from Stetson University College of Law.

He is a visiting lecturer at the University of Chicago Law School and has taught courses at Yale Law School and New York University School of Law.


Alfredo Della Monica is the Vice President & Senior Counsel in the Legal Privacy Team at American Express.  Alfredo is based in NYC and responsible for advising on US privacy issues and he continues to have a limited oversight role with regard to EMEA privacy and data security matters, which he led in the last 5 years. As a subject matter expert, Alfredo has a horizontal view of issues cutting across the different line of businesses and he always works hand-in-hand with other legal colleagues to provide assistance on highly complicated - and cross country - privacy issues.

Prior to joining American Express, Alfredo was an associate at Cleary Gottlieb in Rome and he also worked as intern at the Italian Antitrust Authority and the Federal Trade Commission.

Alfredo graduated summa cum laude at the Law School of the University of Napoli “Federico II” in ’02.  He further completed the European LL.M. degree at the College of Europe (Bruges) in ’06 and also graduated with an LL.M. from Columbia Law School in New York in ‘07. Alfredo holds a post-graduate diploma in computer forensics from the University of Milan. He speaks regularly at conferences and privacy events around Europe. Alfredo also published a few articles on privacy and digital issues such as “the corporate mailbox” and “the online advertisement revolution”. He is a member of the American Express Privacy Board and the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP).

Alfredo is a native Italian speaker, fluent in English, French and with a basic knowledge of Spanish.


Allison M. Zieve is the director of Public Citizen Litigation Group and of the Group’s Supreme Court Assistance Project. Founded in 1972, the Litigation Group is the litigation arm of Public Citizen, a non-profit consumer advocacy organization. Allison joined the Litigation Group in August 1994 and became the Group's director and director of our Supreme Court Assistance Project in 2009. She also serves as General Counsel of Public Citizen.

Allison’s practice addresses access-to-courts issues, consumer health and safety (including food and drug law), the first amendment, administrative law, and government transparency. She has argued five cases before the U.S. Supreme court and many more before federal courts of appeals.

Allison serves as a member of the Administrative Conference of the United States, a member of the American Law Institute, and a board member of the Food and Drug Law Institute. She has taught as an adjunct professor at Georgetown University School of Law and American University’s Washington College of Law. In addition, since its inception, Allison has judged the American Constitution Society's Richard D. Cudahy Writing Competition on Regulatory and Administrative Law. She has written articles for N.Y.U.’s Annual Survey of American Law, Duke Law School’s Law & Contemporary Problems, TRIAL Magazine, US News Weekly, various BNA legal publications, Internal Medicine News, and Regulatory Affairs Journal (UK).

Allison is admitted to the District of Columbia Bar and is admitted to practice before numerous federal courts. She graduated from Brown University and Yale Law School.


Barbara Wall was named Senior Vice President and Chief Legal Officer of Gannett Co., Inc. in 2015 and in March 2019 added the title Interim Chief Operating Officer. In her role as CLO, Barbara is responsible for the legal affairs of the company, heads the corporate legal department and provides legal counsel to the board of directors, chairman of the board, chief executive officer and other senior management. She also provides advice and oversight in numerous areas including strategic transactions, securities, intellectual property, ethics, compliance, and First Amendment.

Wall has written and lectured extensively on free speech issues, intellectual property rights, and the legal issues associated with the digital transformation of the media industry.  Wall is past chair of the American Bar Association’s Forum on Communications Law, a member of the Board of Directors of the News Media Alliance, a Trustee of the Freedom Forum Institute and the Howard Center for Investigative Journalism and has taught communications law as an adjunct professor at George Washington and American universities. In 2012, she received the First Amendment Award from the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and in 2017 she was one selected by the New York County Lawyer’s Association as one of 50 “Outstanding Women in the Legal Profession” to be honored at the organization’s 103rd Annual Dinner in New York City.


Bruce D. Brown is executive director of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press and co-directs the First Amendment Clinic at the University of Virginia Law School.  He received a J.D. from Yale Law School, a master’s degree in English Literature from Harvard University, and a bachelor’s degree in English Literature from Stanford University.

He was previously a partner in Baker Hostetler’s media law practice.  He has argued press cases in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit, and the District of Columbia Court of Appeals.

Brown was a federal court reporter for Legal Times and a newsroom assistant to David Broder at The Washington Post.  Brown’s published work has appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The American Lawyer, The Economist, USA Today, Legal Times, Communications Lawyer, The National Law Journal, and Columbia Journalism Review.


Bruce Keller has been an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of New Jersey since 2015 and currently serves as Special Counsel to the U. S. Attorney.  In addition to his caseload, he helps oversee major prosecutions, policy issues and other matters for the Office.

During his tenure, Bruce has been responsible for various appeals including:

  • “Bridgegate”;
  • the corruption (racketeering, wire fraud and bribery) charges against former Bergen County Democratic chair Joseph Ferriero;
  • the fraud convictions of ex-NBA player C. Tate George;
  • Eighth Amendment juvenile sentencing issues;

as well as cases involving cybercrime, identity theft, child pornography, firearm possession, health care fraud, crimes of violence and other matters.

Before that, he led the intellectual property litigation practice at Debevoise & Plimpton LLP where litigated a number of widely-publicized cases on behalf of:

  • ABC, CBS and NBC against Aereo (involving copyrights to their over-the-air broadcasts);
  • Sony Pictures (involving the mega-hit motion picture Spider-Man and the made-for-television movie “Who is Clark Rockefeller?");
  • Amazon (involving its Kindle device);
  • Howard Stern and CBS Radio (over the on-air handling of cremated remains);
  • the National Football League (involving multiple trademark, copyright and right of publicity matters, including the copyright in the design of the Super Bowl® trophy); and
  • clothing retailer The Gap (involving the famous Gap® trademark).

Mr. Keller is the co-author of two treatises.  The first, with Jeffrey Cunard, is Copyright Law: A Practitioner’s Guide (Second Edition, 2015, supplement forthcoming 2018), published by Practising Law Institute.  The second, The Law of Advertising, Marketing and Promotions (Law Journal Press 2011), was written with David Bernstein, a partner at Debevoise & Plimpton.

Mr. Keller, along with Mr. Cunard, also taught at Harvard Law School and was a Fellow at its Berkman Center for Internet and Society.  In May 2008, both received the Berkman Award, the Center’s highest honor, for their pro bono service as lawyers, educators and co-directors of the Center’s clinical program.

He also was an Advisor to the American Law Institute’s Restatement of the Law: Unfair Competition, and is a member of the Advisory Boards of BNA’s Patent, Copyright and Trademark Journal, the Advertising Compliance Service and The Entertainment Law Reporter, among others.  He has been Counsel to the International Trademark Association (“INTA”), including in connection with the INTA’s amicus brief in the landmark Taco Cabana trade dress case.

******************

Mr. Keller received a B.S. from Cornell University in 1976 and his J.D. from Boston University in 1979.  He is admitted to the bar in New York, Massachusetts and New Jersey.


Cristina Chou joined Time Warner Cable as Vice President, Regulatory Affairs, in September 2008.  In this role, she represents the company before the Federal Communications Commission and other regulatory agencies in matters affecting TWC's video business.

Before joining TWC, Ms. Chou was an attorney at the FCC, serving as Legal Advisor, Media, for Commissioner Robert McDowell and as an Associate Bureau Chief of the Media Bureau.  Prior to working at the FCC, Ms. Chou represented media and communications clients in regulatory matters at Morrison & Foerster, served as an advisor for the Assistant Secretary of the National Telecommunications and Information Administration in the U.S. Department of Commerce, and negotiated transactions as senior counsel at Teleglobe Communications Corp. 

Ms. Chou is a member of the Federal Communications Bar Association.

She is a graduate of Duke University and received her J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law.


Dale Cohen is an experienced media lawyer, executive and educator currently serving as Director of the Documentary Film Legal Clinic at UCLA School of Law and as Special Counsel for FRONTLINE, PBS's award-winning documentary series.  Dale has long and happily grappled with media law and related issues as in-house counsel, as a litigator and as a professor.  Prior to his current positions, Dale served as Vice-President-Administration for Radio Free Europe in Prague.  Dale has also worked in legal and executive positions at Cox Enterprises, Tribune Company and NPR. 

Before going in-house, Dale was a litigation partner concentrating in media, first amendment law and intellectual property for Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal (now Denton’s) in Chicago.  Dale has also taught as an adjunct professor at the University of North Carolina School of Law, Emory University, the Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland and the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University.  He is a co-author of Media and the Law (2d Ed.) (LexisNexis).


David A. Schulz has defended the rights of journalists and news organizations for over 35 years, litigating libel, privacy, access, and newsgathering claims in 20 states.

His regular clients include international news organizations, national and local newspapers, broadcast and cable television networks, station owners, magazine and book publishers, and internet content providers of all types.

More recently, Dave has litigated issues concerning government secrecy in many contexts. He was tapped to provide advice on the WikiLeaks and Edward Snowden disclosures, has pursued reporters’ access rights at Guantanamo Bay, and has represented a number of journalists in federal leak investigations.

In addition to his work at Ballard, Dave is a Clinical Lecturer at Yale Law School and runs the Media Freedom and Information Access (MFIA) Clinic at Yale. The MFIA Clinic supports robust investigative journalism and government transparency by providing pro bono representation to journalists and non-profit organizations on issues involving access to government information, newsgathering, digital privacy, and free speech. Dave has supervised MFIA Clinic students since the clinic was established in 2009.

He has been described by Best Lawyers as “the top access litigator in the country,” a viewed echoed by clients in Chambers USA, which has reported that “there is no-one better in the country on freedom of information and access to the courts.” Chambers USA has described Dave as a “walking encyclopedia” of media law who has played a key role in “a number of important battles” and has been “instrumental in ensuring” that protections for reporters’ confidential sources are “watertight.” The Legal 500 likewise has noted that Dave is “widely praised as a recognized expert on freedom of information and access to the courts.”

Dave began his legal career in New York at Rogers & Wells, which later merged with London-based Clifford Chance, and served as head of the media litigation group at that firm before joining Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz LLP in 2003.  LSKS merged into  Ballard Spahr in 2017.


Floyd Abrams is Senior Counsel in Cahill Gordon & Reindel LLP’s litigation practice group.

Floyd has a national trial and appellate practice and extensive experience in high-visibility matters, often involving First Amendment, securities litigation, intellectual property, public policy and regulatory issues. He has argued frequently in the Supreme Court in cases raising issues as diverse as the scope of the First Amendment, the interpretation of ERISA, the nature of broadcast regulation, the impact of copyright law and the continuing viability of the Miranda rule. Most recently, Floyd prevailed in his argument before the Supreme Court on behalf of Senator Mitch McConnell as amicus curiae, defending the rights of corporations and unions to speak publicly about politics and elections in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission. Floyd's clients have included The McGraw-Hill Companies in a large number of litigations around the country involving claims against its subsidiary, Standard & Poor’s Financial Services LLC, The New York Times in the Pentagon Papers case and others, ABC, NBC, CBS, CNN, Time Magazine, Business Week, The Nation, Reader's Digest, Hearst, AIG, and others in trials, appeals and investigations.

Floyd has represented Standard & Poor’s in litigations about its ratings; he defended the Brooklyn Museum of Art in its legal battles with Mayor Rudolph Giuliani; he represented two of the nation’s largest insurers in litigation under Section 17200 in California and he has frequently testified before congressional committees and prepared clients to do so. In 1998, he represented CNN in investigating and issuing a report on its broadcast accusing the United States of using nerve gas on a military mission in Laos in 1970, and again in 1999 in seeking to persuade the United States Senate to permit the public to view its deliberations as it determined whether or not to convict President Clinton of alleged high crimes and misdemeanors. He represented Nina Totenberg and National Public Radio in the 1992 "leak" investigation conducted by the United States Senate arising out of the confirmation hearing of Justice Clarence Thomas and, in 2004 and 2005, Judith Miller and Matthew Cooper in their efforts to avoid revealing their confidential sources.

In 2006, Floyd was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, an independent research center that conducts multidisciplinary studies of complex and emerging problems advanced by its 4,600 elected members, who are leaders in the academic disciplines, the arts, business and public affairs from around the world. In 2015, Floyd was honored by Yale Law School with its prestigious Award of Merit. Also in 2015, Floyd received the Walter Cronkite Freedom of Information Award presented by the Connecticut Foundation for Open Government. In 2011, Floyd was awarded the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism's Lifetime Achievement Award. In 1998, Floyd was the recipient of the William J. Brennan, Jr. Award for outstanding contribution to public discourse; the Learned Hand Award of the American Jewish Committee; and the Thurgood Marshall Award of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York. In November, 1999, he received the William J. Brennan, Jr. award of the Libel Defense Resource Center. Floyd was awarded, in 1997, the Milton S. Gould Award for outstanding appellate advocacy by the Office of the Appellate Defender in New York. Previously he had been awarded the Ross Essay Prize of the American Bar Association for his study of the Ninth Amendment of the United States Constitution. He has also received awards from, among others, the American Jewish Congress, Catholic University, the New York and Philadelphia Chapters of the Society of Professional Journalists, Sigma Delta Chi, the New York Civil Liberties Union, the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, and the National Broadcast Editorial Association.

In November, 2011, Yale Law School announced the formation of The Floyd Abrams Institute for Freedom of Expression, whose mission is to promote free speech, scholarship and law reform on emerging questions concerning traditional and new media. Developed in cooperation with Floyd, the Institute includes a clinic for Yale Law students to engage in litigation, draft model legislation, and advise lawmakers and policy makers on issues of media freedom and informational access.

The American Bar Association awarded Floyd its Certificate of Merit for his article published in The New York Times Magazine entitled "The New Effort to Control Information," which was described by the ABA as a "noteworthy contribution to public understanding of the American system of law and justice."

Described by Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan as "the most significant First Amendment lawyer of our age," Floyd is top-ranked by Chambers USA. He is listed in Who’s Who LegalWho’s Who in American Law, and has been awarded with Lifetime Achievement Awards by The New York Law Journal and The American Lawyer (2013.)

Floyd, who served as chairman of Mayor Edward Koch's Committee on Appointments, New York City, served as the Chairman of the New York State Zenger Commemoration Planning Committee. Previously, he served as the Chairman of the Communications Committee of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, as well as Chairman of the Committee on Freedom of Speech and of the Press of the Individual Rights Section of the American Bar Association and of the Committee on Freedom of Expression of the Litigation Section of the American Bar Association.

He has appeared frequently on television on Nightline, the News Hour with Jim LehrerCharlie Rose and other programs and has published articles and reviews in The New York TimesThe Washington PostThe Yale Law JournalThe Harvard Law Review, and elsewhere.

Floyd served on the Technology and Privacy Advisory Committee of the U.S. Department of Defense in 2003-4 and as the Chair of the New York State Commission on Public Access to Court Records in 2004.

For fifteen years, Floyd was the William J. Brennan, Jr. Visiting Professor of First Amendment Law at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism. He has, as well, been a Visiting Lecturer at Yale Law School and Columbia Law School and he is author of Friend of the Court: On the Front Lines with the First Amendment, published by Yale University Press (2013) and Speaking Freely: Trials of the First Amendment, published by Viking Press (2005).


George Freeman is Executive Director of the Media Law Resource Center, a non-profit trade association supporting the media in legal matters.  Before that he was Of Counsel to the law firm of Jenner & Block.

For 31 years he was the chief First Amendment lawyer in the Legal Department of The New York Times, leaving as Vice President and Assistant General Counsel in 2012. At the Times, he was primarily responsible for newsroom counseling of The Times, the company’s many other newspapers and its television stations and magazines; he also was responsible for the newspaper’s and company’s litigations, and was at the forefront of numerous high-profile First Amendment cases, including Judy Miller’s resistance to a subpoena in the prosecution of Scooter Libby and the successful defense of The Times in a libel case brought by quarterback Ken Stabler. The Times newspaper didn’t lose or settle a libel case for dollars during his tenure.

He was the William J. Brennan Visiting Professor at the Columbia Journalism School and also for decades taught at New York University and CUNY’s Graduate School of Journalism.  He has been Chair of the ABA’s and NYS Bar Association’s media law committees and was the co-founder and longtime Co-chair of the American Bar Association’s Forum on Communications Law annual (“Boca”) conference.  He is a graduate of Amherst and the Harvard Law School, and is an avid tennis player. 


Gigi Sohn is a Distinguished Fellow at the Georgetown Law Institute for Technology Law & Policy and a Benton Senior Fellow and Public Advocate. She recently completed a year as an Open Society Foundations Leadership in Government Fellow and sixteen months as a Mozilla Policy Fellow. Gigi is one of the nation’s leading public advocates for open, affordable and democratic communications networks. For thirty years, Gigi has worked across the country to defend and preserve the fundamental competition and innovation policies that have made broadband Internet access more ubiquitous, competitive, affordable, open and protective of user privacy.

From 2013 to 2016, Gigi was Counselor to the former Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Tom Wheeler. She advised the Chairman on a wide range of Internet, telecommunications and media issues, representing the Chairman and the FCC in a variety of public forums around the country as well as serving as the primary liaison between the Chairman’s office and outside stakeholders. Singled out by Chairman Wheeler as “the conscience of the Chairman’s office” for her tireless advocacy on behalf of American consumers and competition, Gigi was named by the Daily Dot in 2015 as one of the “Heroes Who Saved the Internet” in recognition of her role in the FCC’s adoption of the strongest-ever Network Neutrality rules.

For twelve years, from 2001-2013, Gigi served as the Co-Founder and CEO of Public Knowledge, the leading communications policy advocacy organization serving the interests of consumers in Washington. She was previously a Project Specialist in the Ford Foundation’s Media, Arts and Culture unit and Executive Director of the Media Access Project, the first public interest law firm in the communications space.

In 1997, President Clinton appointed Gigi to serve as a member of his Advisory Committee on the Public Interest Obligations of Digital Television Broadcasters. The Electronic Frontier Foundation awarded Gigi one of its Internet Pioneer Awards in 2006. In 2014, Gigi was honored with the Broadband Hero Award by OneCommunity, and in 2016, the National Champion for Local Internet Choice” by the Coalition for Local Internet Choice. Last month, Gigi received the Everett C. Parker Award from the Office of Communication of the United Church of Christ, in recognition of 30 years of work in support of greater public access to affordable and open broadband technologies.

Gigi holds a B.S. in Broadcasting and Film, Summa Cum Laude, from the Boston University College of Communication and a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School.


Jennifer E. Rothman is a Professor of Law and the Joseph Scott Fellow at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles. She is an elected member of the American Law Institute and an affiliated fellow at the Yale Information Society Project at Yale Law School.

Professor Rothman is nationally recognized for her scholarship in the intellectual property field, and has become the leading expert on the right of publicity. She created Rothman’s Roadmap to the Right of Publicity, www.rightofpublicityroadmap.com, the go-to-website for right-of-publicity questions and news. Her forthcoming book, The Right of Publicity: Privacy Reimagined for a Public World, will be published by Harvard University Press in early 2018.

Rothman received her A.B. from Princeton University where she received the Asher Hinds Book Prize and the Grace May Tilton Prize. Rothman received her J.D. from UCLA, where she graduated first in her class and won the Jerry Pacht Memorial Constitutional Law Award for her scholarship in that field. Rothman served as law clerk to the Honorable Marsha S. Berzon of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and practiced as an entertainment and intellectual property litigator in Los Angeles at Irell & Manella before entering teaching. Rothman also has an M.F.A. in film production from the University of Southern California, and worked in the film industry for a number of years before embarking on her legal career.


Kathleen M. Sullivan is partner and chair of the national appellate practice at Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, the nation’s largest law firm devoted solely to business litigation.  Before joining the firm in 2005, she served as Dean of Stanford Law School and taught a generation of students constitutional law as Professor of Law at Harvard and Stanford Law Schools. The first woman dean of any school at Stanford, she is also the first (and still the only) woman name partner at any AmLaw 100 firm.

Widely recognized as one of the nation’s most preeminent appellate litigators, Ms. Sullivan handles appeals and motions in a wide range of business litigation matters. She has argued eleven times in the US Supreme Court and numerous times  in the US Courts of Appeals, US district courts, and state appellate courts.  Meanwhile she continues to lecture and write on constitutional issues and to co-author the classic casebook Constitutional Law and its related casebook First Amendment Law.

Ms. Sullivan holds a B.A. from Cornell University, where she was a College Scholar and a Telluride Scholar, an M.A. from Oxford University, which she attended as a Marshall Scholar, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School, where she won the Ames Moot Court competition.  She has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society and the American Law Institute.  And she has been named to numerous honors, including repeat appearances on The National Law Journal’s list of the 100 Most Influential Lawyers in America.


Lucy A. Dalglish became Dean of the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland on August 1, 2012. Located inside the Washington Beltway, Merrill College is one of the nation’s leading journalism schools. Its undergraduate, masters and doctoral programs produce journalists and scholars prepared to inform the public using cutting-edge techniques and technologies.

Dalglish served as executive director of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press from 2000 to 2012. The Reporters Committee is a voluntary, unincorporated association of reporters and news editors dedicated to protecting the First Amendment interests of the news media. Based in Arlington, Va., the Reporters Committee has provided research, guidance and representation in major press cases in state and federal courts since 1970.

Prior to assuming the Reporters Committee position, Dalglish was a media lawyer for almost five years in the trial department of the Minneapolis law firm of Dorsey & Whitney.

From 1980 to 1993, Dalglish was a reporter and editor at the St. Paul Pioneer Press. As a reporter, she covered beats ranging from general assignment and suburbs to education and courts. During her last three years at the Pioneer Press, she served as night city editor, assistant news editor and national/foreign editor.

Dalglish was awarded the Kiplinger Award by the National Press Foundation in 2012 for her service to journalism. In September 2015, she was named a Fellow of the Society by the Society of Professional Journalists, which also awarded her the Wells Memorial Key, the highest honor bestowed by the Society of Professional Journalists, in 1995. A year later, she was one of 24 journalists, lawyers, lawmakers, educators, researchers, librarians and historians inducted into the charter class of the National Freedom of Information Act Hall of Fame in Washington, D.C.

Dalglish appears frequently in print, online and broadcast stories about issues involving the media and the First Amendment. She has been a national leader in supporting open meeting and open records laws at the state and federal level, as well as a key player over the past 10 years in the effort to pass state and federal reporters “shield laws.” She serves on the boards or advisory committees of the American Society of News Editors, Freedom Forum Institute, and the Maryland, DC, Delaware Press Association Foundation.

At the University of Maryland, she has chaired search committees to hire deans for the business school, vice president for diversity & inclusion, and the vice president and university counsel.  In 2017-18, she co-chaired a joint President and University Senate Taskforce on Inclusion and Respect. 

She was recently elected to represent journalism school deans on the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

Dalglish earned a juris doctor degree from Vanderbilt University Law School in 1995; a master of studies in law degree from Yale Law School in 1988; and a bachelor of arts in journalism from the University of North Dakota in 1980. While attending UND, Dalglish worked as managing editor of the Dakota Student and as a reporter and editor for the Grand Forks Herald. She lives in McLean, Va., with her husband, Mark McNair.


Mary-Rose Papandrea is the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and the Judge John J. Parker Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of North Carolina School of Law. Her teaching and research interests include constitutional law, media law, torts, civil procedure, and national security and civil liberties.

After graduating from Yale College and the University of Chicago Law School, Papandrea clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter as well as Hon. Douglas H. Ginsburg of the D.C. Circuit and Hon. John G. Koeltl of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. She then worked as an associate at Williams & Connolly LLP in Washington, DC, where she specialized in First Amendment and media law litigation.

Co-author of the casebook Media and the Law (LexisNexis, 2nd ed. 2014) (with Lee Levine, David Ardia & Dale Cohen), Professor Papandrea has written extensively about various First Amendment and media law topics, including government secrecy and national security leaks, the reporter's privilege, student speech rights, the First Amendment rights of public employees, the government speech doctrine, and the legacy of New York Times v. Sullivan. Representative articles include The Free Speech Rights of University Students, 101 Minn. L. Rev. 1801 (2017); The Government Brand, 110 Nw. L. Rev. 1195 (2016); Leaker Traitor Whistleblower Spy: National Security Leaks and the First Amendment, 94 B.U. Law Rev. 449 (2014); Social Media, Public School Teachers, and the First Amendment, 90 N.C. L. Rev. 1597 (2012); Lapdogs, Watchdogs, and Scapegoats: The Press and National Security Information, 83 Ind. L. J. 233 (2008); and Citizen Journalism and the Reporter's Privilege, 97 Minn. L. Rev. 515 (2007).

Professor Papandrea has served as the Chair of the American Association of Law Schools Mass Media Law and National Security Law sections and remains on the Executive Committee of both sections. She is currently a member of the Editorial Board for the Journal of National Security Law & Policy.


Naomi Waltman is Senior Vice President and Associate General Counsel of CBS Corporation. She serves as co-head of the Intellectual Property section of the CBS Law Department, where she helps develop and implement strategies to protect the company’s intellectual property. She also represents CBS Corp. and its business units in a broad range of litigation matters, including intellectual property, defamation, employment, and general commercial disputes.

Previously, Waltman was Vice President and Senior Counsel at Viacom, Inc., where she provided strategic advice and counseling to Viacom’s business units on a variety of legal issues. Earlier in her career, she was a litigation associate at the law firm of Kaye Scholer in New York, and served as a law clerk to the Honorable Warren W. Eginton of the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut.

Waltman is a frequent panelist and speaker on topics including intellectual property protection, litigation management, and the promotion of women and diversity in the law. In June 2015, she was recognized as Managing IP’s In-House Counsel of the Year in connection with the Euromoney Legal Media Group Americas Women in Business Law Awards.

Waltman received a J.D. from Stanford Law School and a B.A. with Distinction from Stanford University.


Position/Title: Partner

Primary Areas of Practice: Civil appellate law, media litigation, and business litigation

Law School: Yale Law School, 1979

Work History:

  • Law Clerk to the Hon. Robert M. Hill, U.S. District Judge for the Northern District of Texas (1979-80)
  • Locke Purnell (1980-92)
  • Vinson & Elkins L.L.P. (1992 – present)

Professional Memberships: 

Editorial Board:  Communications Lawyer

Immediate Past Board Chair:  National Association of Law Placement (NALP) Foundation

Fellow:  American, Texas, and Dallas Bar Foundations

Research Fellow:  Center for American and International Law

Member:  American Law Institute; American Academy of Appellate Lawyers; Forum Committee on Communications Law, Council of Appellate Lawyers, Litigation and Tort & Insurance Practice Sections, American Bar Association; Litigation and Appellate Sections, State Bar of Texas; Appellate and Business Litigation Sections, Dallas Bar Association.


Randi S. Pollack is Vice President and Digital Media Counsel in the Legal & Business Affairs division at A+E Networks.  A+E Networks is a global media company with a brand portfolio, including A&E®, HISTORY®, Lifetime®, FYI™, LMN® and VICELANDnetworks.   In addition to its television properties, A+E operates digital properties on various platforms, including Lifetime Movie Club®, HISTORY Vault™, Planet H™ apps for children, watch apps for its channels and casual games for several television series.

Randi drafts and negotiates various agreements related to global content licensing for linear and digital distribution with channel partners and syndication sales, digital video licensing and distribution (streaming, VOD, TVE, DTO, and OTT), A+E’s websites and apps, and digital advertising, analytics and operations.  She works closely with the rights team to analyze digital rights for new digital platforms and technologies.  She also advises various business divisions at A+E on agreements, issues and risks surrounding privacy/data security matters, including collection, use and storage of data.  

Prior to joining A+E, Randi was Assistant General Counsel at 4Kids Entertainment, Inc., where she reviewed and negotiated a wide variety of agreements related to various children entertainment properties (including, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Yu-Gi-Oh! and Chaotic) and licensing of non-children’s brands. 

Randi graduated from The University of Arizona and William Mitchell College of Law (now Mitchell Hamline School of Law). 


Sherrese Smith is a partner in the Media, Technology and Telecommunications practice and is Vice-Chair of the Data Privacy and Cybersecurity practice at Paul Hastings and is based in the firm’s Washington, D.C. office. She is a highly regarded and Chambers-ranked attorney who regularly counsels companies on complex transactional and regulatory issues involving communications and media regulatory, technology, and industry issues. She also advises and counsels multinational companies across various jurisdictions (including the US, EU and Asia) on data privacy and cybersecurity and breach response issues, including managing global privacy and information security risks and compliance matters and regularly navigates clients through data breach and crisis response and associated regulatory investigations and enforcement proceedings.

Prior to joining Paul Hastings, she served as Chief Counsel for Chairman Julius Genachowski at the Federal Communications Commission. In this position, she managed the overall policy agenda for the agency and developed the FCC’s positions and key messages for all media, telecommunications, and mobile policy issues and specialized in the areas of media, Internet, video, broadcast, cable, broadband, IP, mobile and wireless spectrum issues, telemarketing issues, and data privacy and security.  Prior to joining the FCC in 2009, Ms. Smith was Vice President and General Counsel of Washington Post Digital.


Stephanie Abrutyn is senior vice president & chief counsel, Litigation, for Home Box Office, Inc., responsible for the full range of legal issues and proceedings arising from the operations, distribution and programming of Home Box Office, Inc.  Abrutyn also oversees HBO's litigation group and anti-piracy program.  She was named to the position in July 2015.

Abrutyn initially joined HBO as a senior counsel in June 2005.

Prior to HBO, she served as senior counsel, East Coast Media, for Tribune Company, from 1999 to 2005, where she counseled and represented six of its daily papers including Newsday, The Hartford Courant and The Baltimore Sun.  During her tenure there she received the Tribune Company Corporate Excellence Award for her contributions to the company.  From 1996 to 1999, Abrutyn worked at ABC, Inc. as a general attorney, Litigation and Employment Practices; and from 1991 to 1996, was a member of the Media and Communications Practice Team in the Washington, D.C., office of Baker & Hostetler.

She is currently on the New York State Bar Association Media Law Committee and a member of the Governing Board of the ABA Forum on Communications Law.  She also is an adjunct professor of Media Law at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law and is a frequent speaker and author on First Amendment and media law issues. She is a former member and chair of the Board of Directors at the Media Law Resource Center Institute and a former co-editor of Communications Lawyer.

Abrutyn holds a BA with honors from Colgate University, a JD degree from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, and studied at the Institute of Political and Economic Studies in London, England.


Steven G. Brody is a partner in the law firm of Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP, based in its New York office. He has represented parties and amici curiae in many commercial speech cases, including numerous cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, federal circuit courts, and state supreme courts. Mr. Brody also counsels clients with respect to a broad range of advertising issues.

Mr. Brody frequently appears as a panelist to discuss First Amendment issues, including on panels at Practising Law Institute's annual communications law seminar in New York. He also has authored numerous articles on First Amendment issues. Among other publications, he is the co-author of "Advertising and Commercial Speech: A First Amendment Guide."

After graduating from Williams College, Mr. Brody obtained his J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School. Earlier in his career, he was a partner at Bingham Mccutchen, McKee Nelson, King & Spalding and Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft.


Co-chair of the Cybersecurity and Data Privacy Group at Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney, Sue Friedberg advises clients about the rapidly evolving standards of care for safeguarding confidential information and responding effectively to security incidents that threaten to compromise valuable information.  Her cybersecurity practice evolved from her work for many years as Buchanan’s Associate General Counsel and her continuing practice counsel to lawyers, legal departments, law firms and other professionals about conflicts of interest, complex client engagements, and meeting the standards for professional practice in the digital age. In her work with clients and for the Firm, Sue has experienced the complexities and challenges of implementing information security best practices in the everyday working environment, without sacrificing effective and efficient operations.

Sue regularly participates in continuing legal education and other programs presented by the ABA, Practicing Law Institute, Professional Education Network, Pennsylvania Bar Institute, the AON Large Law Firm Symposium and other legal education events. 


Jack Weiss is Of Counsel to Liskow & Lewis and Chancellor Emeritus of the LSU Paul M. Hebert Law Center. From 2007 to 2015, Mr. Weiss served as Chancellor (Dean) of the LSU Law Center and Professor of Law. At LSU, Mr. Weiss taught courses in First Amendment Rights of Expression and Association, Media Law, and Comparative Media Law.

From 1998 to 2007, Mr. Weiss was a partner in the New York office of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, LLP. Mr. Weiss served as principal outside publication counsel to Dow Jones & Company, Inc., the publisher of The Wall Street Journal, Barron’s, and their respective online editions. From 1975 to 1998, Mr. Weiss practiced law in New Orleans, where he represented numerous national and local publishing and broadcast clients.

At Liskow, he continues to advise clients on First Amendment and related matters. 

Beginning in 1980, Mr. Weiss taught as an adjunct faculty member at Columbia, Tulane, and Louisiana State University Law Schools. From 2001 to 2007, he co-taught a seminar at Columbia Law School, “The First Amendment and the Institutional Press”, with Judge Robert D. Sack of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. From 1998 to 2007, he was the principal speaker on libel law at the annual Communications Law conference of the Practicing Law Institute. From its inception in 1982 until 2010, Mr. Weiss was the Louisiana reporter for the Media Law Resource Center’s 50 State Annual Surveys of Libel and Privacy Law. He also served as the first Louisiana Reporter for the Survey of State Public Records and Open Meetings Laws published periodically by the Reporters’ Committee for the Freedom of the Press. Mr. Weiss is a member of the New York, District of Columbia, and Louisiana bars. He is a life member of the American Law Institute.

Mr. Weiss served as law clerk to Chief Justice Warren E. Burger of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1972 to 1973, and as law clerk to Fifth Circuit Judge John Minor Wisdom from 1971 to 1972. He earned his Juris Doctor degree magna cum laude in 1971 from Harvard Law School, where he was Treasurer and Managing Editor of the Harvard Law Review. In 1968, Mr. Weiss graduated cum laude with high honors in English Literature from Yale University, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa.


Jane E. Kirtley is the Silha Professor of Media Ethics and Law at the Hubbard School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Minnesota. She is also Director of The Silha Center for the Study of Media Ethics and Law and is an affiliated faculty member at the University of Minnesota Law School. 

Prof. Kirtley was a Fulbright Scholar teaching U.S. media law and media ethics at the University of Latvia’s Law Faculty in Riga during Spring 2016. She was a Pulitzer Prize juror in 2015, and serves on the ABA’s Standing Committee on the Silver Gavel Awards for Media and the Arts.

Prof. Kirtley has written friend of the court briefs in media law and Freedom of Information Act cases, as well as articles and chapters on media law and media ethics for scholarly journals and the popular and professional press. In 2010, her Media Law handbook was published by the U.S. Department of State, and has been translated into nine languages. She co-authored a textbook, Media Ethics Today, which was published in 2016.

Prior to coming to the University of Minnesota, Prof. Kirtley was Executive Director of The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press for 14 years. Before that, she was an attorney with Nixon, Hargrave, Devans and Doyle in Rochester, N.Y. and Washington, D.C. She is a member of the New York, District of Columbia, and Virginia bars. Prof. Kirtley also worked as a reporter for the Evansville (Indiana) Press and The Oak Ridger and Nashville Banner (Tennessee).

Prof. Kirtley’s J.D. is from Vanderbilt University Law School, where she was Executive Articles Editor of the Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law.


Karen Kaiser was named Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary for The Associated Press in 2014. Karen is responsible for overseeing the AP’s legal department, including all editorial, litigation, intellectual property, contract and licensing, compliance, and corporate legal matters. As Corporate Secretary, Karen provides corporate governance advice on issues impacting the company and the Board.

Karen has twice been honored as one of “America’s 50 Outstanding General Counsel” by the National Law Journal. In 2014, the award was given to Karen for leading AP’s legal response to the Department of Justice’s seizure of AP’s phone records, and in 2016, the award was for Karen’s championing of AP’s First Amendment rights.

Karen joined AP in 2009. Prior to becoming General Counsel, Karen was Associate General Counsel, counseling the newsroom globally on all editorial matters including subpoena defense, government investigations, reporter’s privilege, newsgathering and source issues, libel defense, prepublication review, FOIA, and access. Following the DOJ’s seizure of AP’s phone records in 2013, Karen advocated for AP’s interests in high-level DOJ discussions that led to revisions to the guidelines for subpoenas to members of the press. Karen received AP’s Oliver S. Gramling Achievement Award in 2013 for this work, and in 2014, AP received the SPJ Eugene Pulliam First Amendment Award for that same work. Karen serves as part of the DOJ’s News-Media Task Force, where she meets with the Attorney General on issues of importance to the press.

Karen has drafted and filed more than 200 appeals on FOIA denials. These FOIA efforts were highlighted in a 2010 New York Times article, and AP’s FOIA efforts were honored with the SPJ Eugene Pulliam First Amendment Award in 2011. In 2015, Karen testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee in support of stronger FOIA reforms.

Prior to joining AP, Karen was Senior Counsel at Tribune Company. Karen helped pass the Connecticut Reporter’s Shield Law by co-drafting the legislation and testifying before Connecticut’s joint judiciary committee in 2006. Previously, Karen was a litigation associate at Cahill Gordon & Reindel, where she worked on First Amendment cases such as the Valerie Plame Leak Investigation and Wen Ho Lee case. Karen clerked for the Honorable Kevin Thomas Duffy in the SDNY. 

Karen is on the Steering Committee of the RCFP. Karen holds a B.A. in Philosophy and Economics from The University of Pennsylvania, and a J.D. from Fordham Law School.


Kathleen A. Kirby is a Partner with Wiley Rein LLP Washington, DC and Co-Chair of the firm’s Telecom, Media & Technology group.  Ms. Kirby’s practice involves advising some of the country’s largest media groups on regulatory and policy matters, representing radio and television stations in connection with the full realm of FCC compliance, and counseling clients on the sale and acquisition of broadcast properties.  In addition, Ms. Kirby assists television, radio, and new media clients with drafting and negotiating a variety of content and licensing agreements, including network affiliation and syndicated programming deals. She has additional expertise in newsgathering, content regulation, and First Amendment issues. Regularly rated by Chambers USA as one of Washington, DC’s “Leading Lawyers” in her field, Ms. Kirby is commended for “her work on First Amendment and FCC matters” and her “responsiveness and proactive approach.”  She is praised for her “superior subject expertise, commitment to her clients, and great connections within the industry.”

Ms. Kirby has long served as counsel to the Radio Television Digital News Association News Association (“RTDNA”), advising electronic journalists on a variety of legal and legislative matters, including freedom of information, privacy, libel, content regulation, copyright and other First Amendment issues.  She is an inductee of the National Freedom of Information Hall of Fame and recipient of RTDNA’s prestigious First Amendment Leadership Award.

Before attending law school, Ms. Kirby worked for almost a decade as a radio broadcaster in New York and Connecticut, where she gained extensive experience first as a reporter and news anchor, then in management positions in operations, sales, and marketing.

Ms. Kirby obtained her J.D. degree as a Dean’s Scholar from the Catholic University of America, where she received served as Executive Editor of the Catholic University Law Review.  Ms. Kirby simultaneously completed coursework in Catholic University’s Institute for Communications Law Studies.  She received her bachelor’s degree in accounting and marketing from the University of Virginia, where she was selected for Lawn Residence on the basis of leadership and academic merit and was instrumental in founding one of the country’s first student-owned and operated commercial radio stations.  She continues to advise WUVA-FM as a member of the station’s alumni interest group.

Ms. Kirby serves on the Media Institute’s First Amendment Advisory Council.  She is an active member of both the Federal Communications Bar Association and the American Bar Association’s Forum on Communications Law (ABA), and has held leadership positions within both throughout her career.  


Kelli Sager has spent more than thirty years representing media and entertainment companies and individual journalists, including broadcasters, cable companies, film producers and distributors,  newspapers and magazines, book authors, and Web publishers. She is a partner in Davis Wright Tremaine LLP’s Los Angeles office, and has regularly been recognized among the top lawyers in her field. Among other accolades, Kelli has been ranked by Chambers USA for more than ten consecutive years in its top tier of media attorneys in the country, including being listed as one of two “star” individuals nationwide in 2019, and she has been included as one of Lawdragon’s 500 Leading Lawyers in America since 2005. She also has been among the top lawyers recognized by the Los Angeles Daily Journal for many years, including being named in 2019 to its lists of Top 100 Lawyers, Top Intellectual Property Litigators, and Top Women Litigators. Kelli also was named Best Lawyers’ Los Angeles First Amendment Law “Lawyer of the Year” and Los Angeles Media/Entertainment “Lawyer of the Year” for 2019, was named as the Litigator of the Year by the Beverly Hills Bar Association in 2019, and was named as by the Los Angeles Business Journal as one of the “Most Influential Women Attorneys” in 2018.

Kelli has served in leadership roles in many bar associations and non-profit organizations, including acting as the Chair of the ABA Forum on Communications Law, Chair of the IBA’s Media Committee, and President of the Media Law Resource Center's Defense Counsel Section. She also has volunteered for the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals for more than a decade, including serving as the chair of the Circuit Conference Committee, and currently is a member of the Circuit’s Courts and Community Committee.


Lynn Oberlander is a leading media attorney and advocate for journalists. Currently, she is the SVP and Associate General Counsel, Media, for Univision, a position she has held since summer of 2018.  From March of 2017 through July 2019, she was EVP and General Counsel at Gizmodo Media Group, where she oversaw the legal operations of one of the nation’s largest digital news companies, which includes the websites Gizmodo, Jalopnik, Deadspin, The Root, and Splinter, among others.  From 2014 through mid-March of 2017, she was the General Counsel, Media Operations for First Look Media, the publisher of national security website The Intercept and documentary film project, Field of Vision. She founded and led the company’s Press Freedom Litigation Fund, which provides funding for cases in support of First Amendment and other press freedoms.  From 2006 until 2014, she was the General Counsel of The New Yorker, where she also wrote for newyorker.com on media law topics.  Earlier in her career, she spent 5 years each at Forbes and NBC.  She is a frequent speaker on freedom of expression and media law topics.

She is a graduate of Yale (where she was an editor on the Yale Daily News) and Columbia Law School. She teaches a graduate course in Media, Corporate Responsibility, and the Law, both in a traditional classroom setting and on-line, at The New School in New York.  She is the former chair of both the board of directors of the Media Law Resource Center and the Communications and Media Law Committee of the New York State Bar Association.  She also a trustee of Jewish Home Lifecare, a nursing home and elder care system in New York.


Mr. Carey handles class-action lawsuits against many different types of organizations and companies. He has served as lead counsel in cases such as the LifeLock Sales and Marketing Litigation, Hyundai Motor America’s cases on sub-frame corrosion and airbag systems and the state of Arizona’s claim against McKesson Corporation for overcharging on prescription drugs. Mr. Carey has argued high-profile cases in federal and state courts across the country.

Current Role:

  • Partner & Executive Committee Member, Hagens Berman Sobol Shapiro
  • Leads Hagens Berman’s Phoenix and Colorado Springs offices
  • Practice focuses on class-action lawsuits, including auto defect, insurance, right of publicity and fraud cases. Mr. Carey's work also extends to bad-faith insurance, personal injury and medical malpractice, with several jury trials involving verdicts with as much as $75 million at stake.
  • Routinely handles jury trials for high-value cases

Recent Success:

  • Helped start HB’s efforts against GM for its ignition system and other recall problems, which is now in the MDL with Hagens Berman leading the litigation
  • Helped originate the Toyota Sudden Unintended Acceleration case, filing the initial Hagens Berman complaints for a case that eventually settled for $1.6 billion
  • Led Hagens Berman’s efforts on the $400 million settlement with Hyundai and Kia corporations over misrepresentations about MPG ratings
  • Helped secure a first-ever ($60 million) settlement for collegiate student-athletes (Keller, consolidated with O'Bannon) from Electronic Arts (EA) and the NCAA for the misappropriation of the student-athletes' likenesses and images for the EA college football video game series. This groundbreaking suit went up to the U.S. Supreme Court before a settlement was reached, providing student-athletes—even current ones—with cash recoveries for the use of their likenesses without permission.
  • Numerous jury verdicts in trials, including complex matters, phasing of threshold issues, liability and damages, trials with more than $75 million at stake and recoveries of treble and punitive damages
  • Represented Donnovan Hill against Pop Warner after he was paralyzed at 13. With Rachel Freeman, Rob secured a settlement that "forever changed youth football" (OC Weekly) and was "unprecedented" and owed a debt of gratitude by those who care about the safety of kids playing football (Washington Post).  Donnovan died tragically during a 2016 surgery. 

Education:

University of Denver, M.B.A., J.D., 1986

Arizona State University, B.S., 1983

Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government, State & Local Government Program, 1992


Mr. Smith is a Professor from Practice at Georgetown Law, where his courses include Constitutional Law and Election Law.  As a Vice President of the Campaign Legal Center, he also continues to litigate cases involving redistricting, vote suppression and campaign finance.  He has more than three decades of litigation experience, including 21 arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court.  Those cases include Lawrence v. Texas, the landmark gay rights case, and Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Ass’n, which established First Amendment rights of those who produce and sell video games.  His First Amendment experience also includes a central role in the case of Reno v. ACLU, where the Supreme Court first accorded full First Amendment protection to the Internet.

In addition, Mr. Smith has argued a number of important voting rights cases at the Supreme Court, including Gill v. Whitford and Vieth v. Jubelirer, involving partisan gerrymandering, LULAC v. Perry, involving the legality of Texas’s mid-decade redrawing of congressional districts, Crawford v. Marion County Election Board¸ involving the constitutionality of a voter identification law, and Harris v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission, involving a constitutional challenge to Arizona’s legislative map.

Mr. Smith previously was a partner in the law firm of Jenner & Block, where he was chair of the firm's Appellate and Supreme Court Practice and co-chair of the firm's Election Law and Redistricting and Media and First Amendment Practices. 

He attended Amherst College and Yale Law School, where he served as Editor-in-Chief of the Yale Law Journal.  He clerked for Judge James L. Oakes of the Second Circuit and Supreme Court Justice Lewis F. Powell Jr.  He is the recipient of numerous awards for his work promoting civil rights and civil liberties, including, in 2010, the Thurgood Marshall Award given by the ABA Section of Civil Rights and Social Justice.  He received an honorary degree from Amherst in 2015 and now serves on the College’s Board of Trustees.


Prior to founding Clare Locke LLP, Tom was an equity partner at one of the nation’s premier litigation firms and has more than 20 years of experience handling high-stakes commercial litigation matters. He is ranked in the 2019 Chambers USA Guide for nationwide first amendment litigation and for global defamation/reputation management in the Chambers HNW directory. Tom is a Super Lawyer for Business Litigation and Media and Advertising and a BTI Consulting Client-Service All-Star MVP.

Tom is best known for representing high-profile clients who are targeted in hostile media investigations or the subject of false statements in the press. He has handled defamation matters for Fortune 500 companies and individuals, including CEOs, hedge-fund managers, university presidents, professional athletes and sports teams, celebrities, journalists, and others who find themselves under reputational attack.

In March, Tom secured a defamation jury verdict for Dr. Fredric Eshelman based on false statements from Puma Biotechnology, Inc. The jury awarded $15.85 million in compensatory and $6.5 million in punitive damages.  He also represented UVA Associate Dean Nicole Eramo in her defamation lawsuit against Rolling Stone magazine relating to a highly publicized article of an alleged gang rape. In November 2016, a jury found the defendants liable for defamation and awarded Ms. Eramo $3 million.


Since June 2016, Jason Conti has served as general counsel at Dow Jones & Company, Inc.  In that capacity, he is responsible for overseeing the company’s legal department, which includes more than 25 professionals with experience in a range of specialties including labor & employment, contract and commercial issues, privacy, IP, M&A, litigation, compliance, media law, and other specialties.  Mr. Conti also is a member of the Dow Jones Executive Committee. In addition, since 2011, Mr. Conti has served as chief compliance officer at Dow Jones.

Prior to taking on the general counsel role, Mr. Conti served as deputy general counsel at Dow Jones, overseeing domestic and international litigation, including media litigation, general commercial litigation, and a variety of other litigation matters.  Mr. Conti also served as the company’s lead press attorney, working closely with the more than 1300 journalists at Dow Jones on a variety of matters including pre-publication review, access, copyright, newsgathering questions, and subpoenas. 

Mr. Conti was previously an attorney at Hogan & Hartson LLP, primarily defending media companies in defamation, privacy and copyright actions.  Mr. Conti joined Dow Jones in March 2008.


Specialising in International, Appellate and Complex litigation, Constitutional, Human Rights, IP, Media & Regulatory work, defamation, privacy, media, art and cultural property, data protection and freedom of information, intellectual property and international arbitration, Mark Stephens has undertaken some of the highest profile cases in the country and abroad.  In 2011 Her Majesty the Queen appointed Stephens Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) for his services to law and the arts.  Mark is also extremely active in many other areas having been appointed by the Foreign Secretary to the FCO Free Expression advisory board and the Lord Chancellor to be a Champion for the Community Legal Service.  In December 2009, Mark first appeared in “Who’s Who” where he is described as “lawyer, broadcaster; writer; lecturer”.  He has written and contributed to five books.  Mark has been described by the ‘Law Society Gazette’ as, ‘the patron solicitor of previously lost causes’.  It is this reputation for creativity with law that leads clients to his door.

Mark has created a niche in international comparative media law and regulation.  His expertise also covers specialisms in Creative Arts & Cultural Industries, Human Rights, Judicial Review, Complex Commercial Litigation, Intellectual Property law, Privy Council cases - Ultimate Appeal Court for parts of the Commonwealth, as well as, Regulatory Cases & Inquiries.

Mark has practised before every level of Court in England and Wales and has also practised abroad and before international tribunals and courts.  He is also a Privy Council agent regularly working with a range of overseas lawyers. Mark is also a qualified mediator.  He has been retained by a number of Governments to advise and to represent their interests including, Republic of Cyprus, Republic of Greece, Jamaica, Libya, Mauritius, Romania and the Russian Republic.  Additionally, Mark has litigated in countries as diverse as Anguilla, Antigua, Australia, Cyprus, France, India, Iraq, Iran, Italy, Jamaica, Malaysia, Netherlands, Pitcairn Islands, New Zealand, Russia, Rwanda, Samoa, Singapore and the USA.  Mark chairs a number of bodies including the Design Artists Copyright Society, Global Network Initiative, the Management Committee of the Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy Wolfson College, Oxford Centre for Socio Legal Studies, the Bianca Jagger Human Rights Foundation and sits on the boards of Censorship Commonwealth Lawyers Association, Human Rights Council of the International Bar Association and Internews Media Law Defence Initiative Independent Schools Inspectorate and is Hon Solicitor to Index of Censorship. 

Mark regularly appears in print and on radio and television and enjoys debating.


Aaron Rubin is co-chair of the firm’s Technology Transactions Group. He advises clients on a wide range of complex transactions involving intellectual property and technology, including structuring and negotiating strategic licensing, development, collaboration, procurement, and distribution deals. Mr. Rubin also maintains an active practice counseling companies on the intellectual property aspects of mergers, acquisitions, asset spin-offs, and private equity investments.

Mr. Rubin's practice focuses on advising both established and emerging companies in a variety of data- and technology-intensive sectors, including software, SaaS, cloud computing, AR/VR, AI, gaming, healthcare, consumer electronics, social media, e-commerce and other online business models, and mobile applications. He has represented clients such as Autodesk, Facebook, Gap, Konami, Kaiser Permanente, Oculus, Softbank, Visa, and Yahoo, among others. Mr. Rubin is also a co-editor of Socially Aware, Morrison & Foerster's award-winning newsletter and blog devoted to the law and business of social media.

In addition, Mr. Rubin regularly provides pro bono assistance to various non-profit and charitable organizations such as Common Sense Media and the Starlight Children's Foundation, and is a member of the Board of Directors of California Lawyers for the Arts.

Mr. Rubin received his B.A. in philosophy from the University of California, Berkeley in 1991. In 2001, he received his law degree from the University of California, Berkeley, Boalt Hall School of Law, where he was an executive editor of the California Law Review and was elected to the Order of the Coif. Following law school, Mr. Rubin served as law clerk to the Honorable William H. Orrick and the Honorable Martin J. Jenkins, both United States District Judges for the Northern District of California.


Bruce Johnson, a veteran litigator, represents information industry clients on issues involving media and communications law as well as technology and intellectual property matters. His expertise includes advising on First Amendment law issues, particularly involving commercial speech, commercial transactions and consumer rights. The author of Washington’s Reporter’s Shield Law enacted in 2007, the Washington Act Limiting Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation ("Washington Anti-SLAPP Law") enacted in 2010, and Washington’s Uniform Correction or Clarification of Defamation Act enacted in 2013, Bruce represents clients in Internet related litigation and liabilities. He also represents national clients in privacy and security matters, advertising liability risks, defamation and Internet and online liability cases. He is the co-author of "Advertising and Commercial Speech, A First Amendment Guide" (2nd Edition), published by the Practising Law Institute, New York. In addition, Bruce regularly represents lawyers, law firms, and other parties in connection with legal malpractice claims, has spoken on the topic of lawyer liability and professional responsibility on many occasions, and currently serves as the co-chair of the firm’s Quality Assurance Committee.


David McCraw serves as the principal newsroom lawyer for The New York Times.  He has spent 17 years at The Times and currently holds the position of Deputy General Counsel.  He is the author of the book “Truth in Our Times: Inside the Fight for Press Freedom in the Age of Alternative Facts” (St. Martin’s 2019), a first-person account of the legal battles that helped shape The Times’s coverage of Donald Trump, Harvey Weinstein, national security, and the rise of political partisanship in America. He is a visiting lecturer at Harvard Law School and an adjunct professor at the NYU Law School.  Mr. McCraw is a graduate of the University of Illinois, Cornell University, and Albany Law School.


James McLaughlin is deputy general counsel of The Washington Post, where is principally responsible for newsroom-related legal issues and litigation.  His work at The Post includes prepublication review of content, defense of actual or threatened libel claims, newsgathering advice, First Amendment issues, subpoenas, and FOIA.  Since 2015, he has also served as the Post’s director of government affairs, overseeing its participation in legislative, regulatory, and industry matters. Before coming to The Post in 2006, he worked at two Washington, D.C. law firms (Covington & Burling and Zuckerman Spaeder) and, in 2003-04,,  served as the McCormick Tribune Legal Fellow at The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press.  He is a graduate of Amherst College (1995) and Yale Law School (1998), where he was senior editor of the Yale Law Journal, and a former law clerk to the Honorable Anthony J. Scirica of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. McLaughlin serves on several news industry-related boards of directors, and teaches media law as an adjunct professor at Georgetown University Law Center.


Jonathan Donnellan is Vice President and Co-General Counsel for Hearst Corporation, one of the world’s largest diversified media, information and services companies with more than 360 businesses. He is also an adjunct professor at Columbia Law School, where he teaches a seminar on the The First Amendment and The Press.  Previously, Jon served as Vice President and Deputy General Counsel for the New York Daily News, U.S. News & World Report, and two other media companies concurrently.  Before that, he was Assistant General Counsel for CNN in Atlanta. He spent his first decade of practice as a litigator at Cahill Gordon & Reindel. He is past chair of the New York City Bar Association’s Communications and Media Law Committee, and the ABA’s First Amendment and Media Litigation Committee, and is a former member of the Governing Committee of the ABA Forum on Communications Law. He received his undergraduate and law degrees from NYU.


Joseph C. Gratz is partner with Durie Tangri LLP in San Francisco.  A Trustee of the Copyright Society of the USA and an Advisor to the forthcoming ALI Restatement of Copyright, Mr. Gratz is a respected litigator and commentator on copyright and Internet law.  He was named one of the nine Top Intellectual Property Lawyers Under 40 by Law360 in 2015, and a Northern California IP Litigation SuperLawyer each year since 2013 by SuperLawyers Magazine, after being named a Rising Star in IP Litigation in 2010, 2011, and 2012.  Mr. Gratz received his B.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his J.D., cum laude, from the University of Minnesota Law School.  After law school, he served as a law clerk to the Honorable John T. Noonan, Jr. of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.


Len Niehoff serves as Professor from Practice at the University of Michigan Law School, where he teaches courses in civil procedure, ethics, evidence, First Amendment, law & theology, and media law. He is the author of more than one-hundred publications in these fields. He is also Of Counsel to Honigman Miller Schwartz & Cohn, where he helps lead the firm’s appellate, higher education, and media law practices. He has been quoted as an expert on various legal issues by the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio, Voice of America, the Columbia Journalism Review, the Intercept, the Detroit News, the Detroit Free Press, and other major media entities. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan Law School.


Jeff Glasser is General Counsel of the Los Angeles Times and San Diego Union-Tribune. As head of the company’s legal department, Glasser handles newsroom counseling, litigation, intellectual property, contract and commercial matters, employment, privacy, compliance and other legal issues. In addition, he represents the Los Angeles Times and San Diego Union-Tribune in legislative and policy matters in California and Washington, D.C. Glasser is a board member and chair of the Governmental Affairs Committee for the California News Publishers Association and a member of the Legal Affairs Committee for the News Media Alliance.  From 2013-2018, Glasser served as co-chair of the Media Law Resource Center’s California chapter.

Before joining the company in 2013, Glasser practiced law at Davis Wright Tremaine LLP, worked as a senior editor at U.S. News & World Report and served as Bob Woodward’s researcher on “Shadow: Five Presidents and the Legacy of Watergate.”

A graduate of Yale University, Glasser received his law degree from the University of California, Berkeley School of Law.


Jennifer Pariser is the Vice President, Copyright and Legal Affairs at the Motion Picture Association.  She provides counsel on a wide range of intellectual property and other legal issues for the association, oversees the studios’ relationship with academic institutions and the filing of amicus briefs in significant copyright cases. She has worked extensively on DMCA notice and takedown matters and ran the Copyright Alert System.  Prior to joining the MPAA, Jenny previously served as head of litigation at the RIAA and at Sony Music where she oversaw all litigation matters including significant lawsuits against online copyright pirates such as Napster, Grokster, Limewire as well as individual infringers.  Prior to that she was an associate with the firms Patterson, Belknap, Webb & Tyler and Debevoise & Plimpton in New York and also served as a judicial clerk to the Honorable Charles Tenney in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. She graduated from New York University Law School where she was a member of the Law Review and the School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.  She lectures extensively on copyright topics including at the Copyright Society of the USA, the American and New York Bar Associations, PLI and various law schools.


Professor RonNell Andersen Jones is an Affiliated Fellow at Yale Law School’s Information Society Project and the Associate Dean of Faculty and Research and Lee E. Teitelbaum Chair at the University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law.

A former newspaper reporter and editor, Professor Jones is a First Amendment scholar who teaches, researches and writes on legal issues affecting the press and on the intersection between media and the courts. Her scholarship addresses issues of press access and transparency and the role of the press as a check on government. She is also a widely cited national expert on reporter’s privilege and newsgathering rights and a regular speaker on emerging areas of social media law. Her scholarly work has appeared in numerous books and journals, including Northwestern Law Review, Michigan Law Review, UCLA Law Review, Minnesota Law Review, and the Harvard Law Review Forum. She is also a regular public commentator on press freedom issues. Her op-eds have been published in several major news outlets, including CNN and The New York Times, and her research has been quoted in Newsweek, the Washington Post, the New York Times, and other national publications.

Professor Jones graduated first in her law school class and clerked for the Honorable William A. Fletcher on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals and for Justice Sandra Day O’Connor on the United States Supreme Court. Prior to entering academia, she was an attorney in the Issues & Appeals section of Jones Day, where her work focused on Supreme Court litigation and included major constitutional cases.

Before joining the faculty at the University of Utah, Professor Jones was Professor of Law and Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Research at Brigham Young University, where she was twice named Professor of the Year. Before that, she was a Distinguished Faculty Fellow at the University of Arizona, where she team-taught an annual course about the United States Supreme Court with Justice O’Connor.


Barton Beebe is the John M. Desmarais Professor of Intellectual Property Law at New York University School of Law.  He has been the Anne Urowsky Visiting Professor of Law at Yale Law School, a Visiting Professor of Law at Stanford Law School, and a Visiting Research Fellow at Merton College, Oxford University.  He has also taught courses at the Centre d'Études Internationales de la Propriété Intellectuelle at the Université de Strasbourg, the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center, the State Intellectual Property Office of the People’s Republic of China, the Hanken School of Economics in Helsinki, Finland, and Hebrew University in Israel.  In 2007, Professor Beebe was a Special Master in the case of Louis Vuitton Malletier v. Dooney & Bourke, Inc., No. 04 Civ. 2990 (SAS) (S.D.N.Y.).  His published works include Intellectual Property Law and the Sumptuary Code, 123 Harvard Law Review 809 (2010), and An Empirical Study of U.S. Copyright Fair Use Opinions, 1978-2005, 156 Pennsylvania Law Review 549 (2008).  He is also the author of the free online casebook Trademark Law: An Open-Source Casebook, which is now used in over twenty law schools.  Professor Beebe clerked for Judge Denise Cote of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York.


Erin L. Dozier is Senior Vice President and Deputy General Counsel at the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), where she represents the interests of thousands of local television and radio broadcast stations and broadcast networks before the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), other federal agencies, and courts. Her main areas of focus include laws and policies affecting media ownership, indecency and other content-related standards, carriage of television broadcast signals by facilities-based and over-the-top multichannel video providers, set-top boxes/navigation devices, and advertising. Erin’s experience prior to joining NAB includes several positions at the FCC focusing on media regulation and policy, including FCC review of media and broadband mergers, and competition policy affecting media outlets. She also has worked in private practice counseling communications companies on legal and regulatory matters. Erin is a frequent lecturer on communications policy and has served on the adjunct faculty of the Catholic University of America’s Columbus School of Law. She earned her B.A. at Hampshire College and her J.D. at the Georgetown University Law Center. 


Jessica Lyon is an attorney in the Division of Privacy and Identity Protection at the Federal Trade Commission. Ms. Lyon investigates and prosecutes violations of U.S. federal laws governing the privacy and security of consumer information, as well as violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act. Ms. Lyon was the lead attorney on the Henry Schein Practice Solutions investigation, resolved earlier this year when the company agreed to settle FTC allegations that it marketed its dental practice management software using deceptive claims that the software provided industry-standard encryption of sensitive patient information. Prior to joining the FTC, Ms. Lyon worked at Consumers’ Union and Prisoners’ Legal Services of New York. Ms. Lyon earned her law degree from Berkeley Law and her undergraduate degree from Binghamton University.


Tom Hentoff serves as Co-Chair of Williams & Connolly LLP’s Trademark and Copyright and First Amendment and Media practice groups. His practice is concentrated in three areas: intellectual property disputes, First Amendment and media law, and complex civil litigation.   Tom has represented clients in a wide variety of copyright, trademark, trade secret, defamation, privacy, false-advertising, and class action litigation and counseling matters.  Clients represented in defamation cases include newspapers, online news organizations, news magazines, motion picture studios, and television broadcasters and programmers. He has also represented clients in a broad range of civil litigation matters at the trial and appellate levels.